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Historic House Museums and Public Spaces

We're building an extensive list of historic house museums. If you are the curator or know of an interesting old house museum we want you to include it here for all the old house community to see. Submit a historic house museum to OldHouses.com

From Our Listing Database

Hyland House Museum

Hyland House Museum
Guilford,

A living museum of 17th and 18th century life. The House is open for guided tours from June through September.

More info...

Web Site: www.hylandhouse.org

Blount Mansion

Blount Mansion
Knoxville,

William Blount was born in North Carolina, served in North Carolina's House of Commons and as paymaster for North Carolina's troops in the Continental Army. He served in Congress under the Articles of Confederation, and as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. William Blount chose to build his mansion in Knoxville after signing the Treaty of the Holston just a few yards away from the Mansion's location. Blount's Knoxville mansion would serve as the territorial capitol, as well as a family home. The care in construction, and the size and shape of Blount Mansion reflects Blount's position as a political figure, head of a prominent family, and influential businessman.
The house was made of sawn lumber to meet Mary Blount's requirement of "a proper wooden house." The lumber was brought from North Carolina, since most of the area's residents built log cabins and log houses in the 1790s. Nails were brought from the Blount family's naillery near Tarboro, North Carolina, and glass was brought from near Richmond, Virginia. The Mansion was a hall-parlor type house with a hall, the main room for family activity, and a parlor, for more formal activities. Upstairs there was a single sleeping chamber.
Research on the historic structure and archaeology evidence suggests that the west wing was added to the Mansion first. It was most likely an outbuilding, pulled from its foundation and drug to the Mansion wall, where it was added in. Blue beads and other artifacts recovered during archaeological investigations of the site, suggest that the west wing may have been Slaves' quarters when still detached from the Mansion. The east wing was added last, perhaps as late as 1820.
The kitchen is a recreation of an eighteenth-century kitchen, but is located on the site of the original kitchen. The Governor's Office was a typical "law office" of the 1790s, built right on the edge of State Street. The cooling shed, was excavated during an archaeological dig in the 1950s, and the shed roof was rebuilt under the supervision of the National Park Service at that time.

More info...

Web Site: blountmansion.org

Arizona

Rosson House Museum

Rosson House Museum
Phoenix, Arizona

This 2,800 square foot beautiful Eastlake architectural style Victorian home built in 1895 features ten rooms and five fireplaces. View what life was like for Rosson House residents of Block 14, owners and tenants both, in early Phoenix during Arizona’s late territorial times all in its original location. Docent guided tours are held on the half hour and last approx. 30 minutes. Open: Wednesday-Saturday (10am-4pm) and Sunday (Noon-4pm). Admission: $7.50 adults, $6 seniors, students & military, $4 children 6-12 years old, Free 5 years old & under. Last tour on each day starts at 3:30pm

More info...

Web Site: www.rossonhousemuseum.org

Arkansas

Peel Mansion and Heritage Gardens

Peel Mansion and Heritage Gardens
Bentonville, Arkansas

In 1875, Colonel Samuel West Peel built a marvelous villa tower Italianate mansion on the outskirts of Bentonville, Arkansas. It was a working farmstead surrounded by 180 acres of apple trees. The Peel Mansion is an outdoor museum of heritage roses, perennials, and native plants. Various vignette gardens are interlaced among curvilinear walks and large shade trees creating a most appropriate setting for this northwest Arkansas landmark that is also on the Historical Register.

Also on the site is the pre-Civil War Andy Lynch log cabin which serves as a gatehouse and gift shop at the entrance to the grounds. The cabin was moved to the Peel Mansion property from Brightwater, Arkansas, east of Rogers.

Tours of the Peel Mansion are available March – December, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday. Tours are $5 for adults, and $2 for children ages 6-12. Free admission for children under age 6.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.peelcompton.org/peel/index.htm

California

Scotty's Castle

Scotty's Castle
Death Valley, California

Scotty's Castle was built between 1922 and 1931 by millionaires from Chicago as a Death Valley vacation home. Albert and Bessie Johnson came to love Death Valley after investing in a non-existant gold mine with conman Walter "Scotty" Scott. Today, nearly all the clothing, curtains, carpets and furniture are original to the Johnsons and Scotty, which makes it easy to connect to their experiences here.

More info...

Web Site: www.nps.gov/deva

Knox House Museum

Knox House Museum
El Cajon, California

Built in 1876, the Knox House is the oldest commercial building in El Cajon and was originally a two-story, seven-room structure serving as a residence/hotel and known then as the Knox Hotel.The interior has accurate period colors along with period furniture and artifacts.

More info...

Web Site: elcajonhistory.org

Lake County Stone House

Lake County Stone House
Hidden Valley Lake, California

Stone House is the oldest building in Lake County, CA., built over the winter of 1853-54. Stone House Historical Society is dedicated to its restoration and preservation.

More info...

Web Site: www.lakecountystonehouse.com

Heritage Square Museum

Heritage Square Museum
Los Angeles, California

The eight historic structures located at the museum, constructed during the Victorian Era, were saved from demolition and serve as a perfect background to educate the public about Southern California's early development. From the simplicity of the Octagon House to the opulence of the Perry Mansion, the Museum provides a unique look at the lifestyles of the people who contributed so much to the development of modern Los Angeles.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.heritagesquare.org/index.htm

William S. Hart Park and Museum

William S. Hart Park and Museum
Newhall, California

The William S. Hart Park and Museum is the former retirement home of the famed silent film actor and director who produced a series of hit Western movies in the early 1900s. His beautiful Spanish Colonial Revival Style Mansion -- now the Museum -- exhibits an impressive collection of Western artwork by noted artists Charles M. Russell, Frederic Remington, and Joe de Yong, as well as mementos from early Hollywood, personal furnishings and effects, and artifacts representing multiple Native American cultures. The Museum also includes an historic 1910 Ranch House that exhibits Hart's tack and saddle collection, personal furnishings, and additional Hollywood mementos. Both the Mansion and the Ranch House are located in scenic William S. Hart Park, where guests may enjoy visiting a live collection of farm animals, a herd of American bison, a vast picnic area, a series of hiking trails, and a charming Western-themed Gift Store.

The Museum's Mansion is open for free guided tours Wednesday - Sunday.

More info...

Web Site: www.hartmuseum.org

Lott Home in Sank Park

Lott Home in Sank Park
Oroville, California

Besides the original house which is open for tours three days a week, the property (encompassing a city block) features beautiful lawns and landscaping, a carriage house and gazebo, and a long wisteria covered arbor that reaches from just in front of the house to the sidewalk in front of the property.

Portions of the grounds can be rented for weddings and other events.

Today, the house is best known for the romantic story that unfolded on its grounds--read the rest of the description for the details!

More info...

Web Site: http://www.cityoforoville.org/index.aspx?page=128

Dutra Museum of Dredging

Dutra Museum of Dredging
Rio Vista, California

The Dutra Museum of Dredging is a private collection of materials representing the history of sidedraft clamshell dredging in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the role the Dutra family and Dutra companies have played in building the Delta infrastructure.
The collection is housed in a craftsman style mansion built in 1907 and located in Rio Vista, California. The museums content includes many photographs, log books, ledgers, dredge models, original engineer drawings on linen, mammoth bone extracted from a Delta island and a family history mural that details the Dutra family’s beginnings as Portuguese whalers. Noted Delta artist and family friend, Marty Stanley, painted the mural. The home is currently owned by the Dutra Museum Foundation.

More info...

Web Site: www.dutramuseum.com

Hearst Castle

Hearst Castle
San Simeon, California

Hearst Castle is California's premiere House Museum. Originally owned by Publisher, Politician and Movie Producer William Randolph Hearst. Julia Morgan spent 28 years- to design, build, furnish and never finish this country home for Client W.R. Hearst. Professionally guided interpretive tours are available 362 days per year. Call (800) 444-4445 to schedule at least one of five tours...

More info...

Web Site: hearstcastle.com/

Heritage Museum of Orange County

Heritage Museum of Orange County
Santa Ana, California

More info...

Web Site: www.heritagemuseumoc.org

Colorado

McAllister House Museum

McAllister House Museum
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado Springs' oldest substantial home completed in 1873 for Major Henry McAllister, one of the founding fathers of Colorado Springs.

More info...

Web Site: www.mcallisterhouse.org/

Molly Brown House Museum

Molly Brown House Museum
Denver, Colorado

Experience the 1889 home of the unsinkable heroine of the Titanic, Margaret "Molly" Tobin Brown.

More info...

Web Site: www.mollybrown.org

Byers-Evans House Museum

Byers-Evans House Museum
Denver, Colorado

Built in 1883 for Rocky Mountain News founder William Byers, the home was occupied for 92 years by the Evans family, who were instrumental in founding civic and cultural institutions in Denver. The home has been beautifully restored to the 1912-1924 period and retains 90% of its original furnishings.

More info...

Web Site: www.byersevanshousemuseum.org

Connecticut

Mark Twain House

Mark Twain House
Hartford, Connecticut

Step back to the Gilded Age during guided tours of the 19-room, Tiffany-decorated mansion where Mark Twain raised his family and worked from 1874 to 1891. During this incredibly productive period, Twain created such classics as The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.

More info...

Web Site: www.marktwainhouse.org

The Glebe House & The Gertrude Jeckyll Garden

The Glebe House & The Gertrude Jeckyll Garden
Woodbury, Connecticut

Mid 18th century house, home of John Rutgers Marshall family from 1771-1786; site of the election of first Episcopal bishop, in 1783. Gertrude Jekyll-designed garden only extant garden in North America by England's most influential garden designer of the late 19th early 20th century.

More info...

Web Site: www.theglebehouse.org/

Dist. of Col.

Dumbarton House

Dumbarton House
Georgetown, Washington, Dist. of Col.

The mission of the Dumbarton House museum, a Federal Period historic house, ca. 1800, is to preserve the historic structure and its collections and to educate the public about life in Washington, DC, during the early years of the Republic. Emphasis is placed on Joseph Nourse, first Register of the Treasury, and his family, and their occupation of the property from 1804 through 1813.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.dumbartonhouse.org/index.htm

Meridian House

Meridian House
Washington, Dist. of Col.

Meridian House, built in 1921, is among the finest examples of French 18th-century urban architecture in the United States. Two stories high, the foyer is dominated by a curving double stairway leading up to the grand reception area. The principal rooms retain their architectural detail as well as many original decorative features. The drawing room, library, and dining room are stately, yet intimate. Walls shelter a formal garden, well-known for its grove of European linden trees that shade a pebbled courtyard, which combines with a rambling side garden to make Meridian House one of Washington’s finest settings for outdoor events.

More info...

Web Site: www.meridian.org/

White-Meyer House

White-Meyer House
Washington, Dist. of Col.

The White-Meyer House, a red brick mansion adjacent to Meridian House, was built in 1911 by Ambassador Henry White and later purchased by Eugene Meyer, the owner of the Washington Post. The large rooms of this splendid building have been renovated and restored to their original glory. The main floor includes a spacious entry hall, sitting room, drawing room, library, and dining room, all of which are interconnected. The large drawing room overlooks the side garden. A majestic, columned terrace, accessible from the library and dining room, has a lovely view of Washington, particularly at night.

More info...

Web Site: www.meridian.org/

Tudor Place Historic House and Garden

Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
Washington, Dist. of Col.

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems.

More info...

Web Site: www.tudorplace.org/

Anderson House

Anderson House
Washington, Dist. of Col.

Experience the history and splendor of Gilded Age Washington at Anderson House, a 1905 Beaux Arts mansion built as the winter home of American ambassador Larz Anderson and his wife, Isabel. Anderson House, the headquarters of The Society of the Cincinnati since 1938, offers guided tours of the historic museum rooms, changing exhibitions, a research library, and public programs devoted to the history of Anderson House, the American Revolution, and the Society.

More info...

Web Site: www.societyofthecincinnati.org

Florida

Historic Stranahan House Museum

Historic Stranahan House Museum
Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Stranahan House is a wood-frame vernacular structure with wide porches, Virginia English gardens and a stunning view of the New River in Fort Lauderdale.

More info...

Web Site: www.stranahanhouse.org

Bonnet House Museum & Gardens

Bonnet House Museum & Gardens
Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Caribbean Plantation style home of two American artists on 35 tropical acres on Fort Lauderdale Beach.

More info...

Web Site: www.bonnethouse.org

Historic Palm Cottage

Historic Palm Cottage
Naples, Florida

Under the preservation of the Naples Historical Society, the Palm Cottage™ house museum is the oldest house in Naples (built 1895)and the only historic home in Naples open for tours. It features a fine example of Tabbie Mortar construction, a hand-made concrete consisting of sand, shells and water.The 3,500 square foot house museum is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Event rentals,and walking tours of the neighborhood are also offered.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.napleshistoricalsociety.org/historical.htm

The Ringling Museum of Art

The Ringling Museum of Art
Sarasota, Florida

More info...

Web Site: http://www.ringling.org/

Georgia

Herndon Home Museum

Herndon Home Museum
Atlanta, Georgia

The Herndon Home, or Herndon Mansion as it is called locally, was built for one of the country's wealthiest black men and stands as one of Atlanta's most significant architectural successes.

More info...

Web Site: www.theherndonhome.org

The Hills & Dales Estate

The Hills & Dales Estate
LaGrange, Georgia

A beautiful Italian villa designed by Hentz and Reid for textile magnate Fuller E. Callaway Sr. Completed in 1916, the home blends with the formal boxwood gardens planted in the mid-19th century by Sarah Coleman Ferrell.

More info...

Web Site: www.hillsanddalesestate.org/

Hay House

Hay House
Macon, Georgia

One of Georgia’s most distinguished structures, the Johnston-Felton-Hay House in Macon was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. It was built from 1855 to 1859 in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, a marked contrast to the more restrained Greek Revival architecture of the antebellum period.

More info...

Web Site: www.hayhouse.org/

Isaiah Davenport House Museum

Isaiah Davenport House Museum
Savannah, Georgia

The Isaiah Davenport House is an example of Federal architecture amongst Georgian architecture in downtown Savannah, GA. It was built around 1820 by master builder Isaiah Davenport and shows some of his trade. It also contains an interesting history as a nineteenth century rooming house and twentieth century tenement. The building was almost demolished in 1955 but was saved by a group later to be known as the Historic Savannah Foundation.

More info...

Web Site: www.davenporthousemuseum.org/

Owens-Thomas House

Owens-Thomas House
Savannah, Georgia

The Owens-Thomas House was the first "house museum" in Savannah, GA, opened to the public in 1954. Architectural historians have deemed it the best example of "English Regency" style architecture in the US.

More info...

Web Site: www.telfair.org

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace (The Wayne Gordon House)

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace (The Wayne Gordon House)
Savannah, Georgia

Juliette Gordon Low, founder of Girl Scouts of the USA, was born on October 31, 1860, in Savannah, Georgia and was affectionately known as “Daisy." The building is owned by the Girl Scouts of the USA, and is a popular historic house museum for the general public and for Girl Scouts. It is commonly known as "The Birthplace".

in 1912, Low founded the Girl Scouts. She telephoned her cousin, saying "Come right over! I've got something for the girls of Savannah, and all America, and all the world, and we're going to start it tonight." She recruited girls all over town, on the steps of churches and the synagogue, and the daughters of friends and acquaintances.

The Birthplace is open for tours for the general public year 'round.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.juliettegordonlowbirthplace.org/

Pebble Hill Plantation

Pebble Hill Plantation
Thomasville, Georgia

This winter residence of the Hanna family of Cleveland, Ohio houses one of the nation’s most extensive collections of sporting art, bronzes,19th century furniture, porcelain, silver, crystal, glassware,33 Audubon lithographs, etc. The treasures of the Main House are the result of two generations of collecting. Architect Abram Garfield designed the Main House and numerous outbuildings, including a magnificent stable complex. The 3,000-acre estate includes lush grounds and gardens. House guests included many distinguished artists such as Ogden Pleissner and Richard Bishop; Gina Bachauer, international concert pianist; presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Jimmy Carter; ambassadors, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor; 1930s writer, actress and dramatist, Cornelia Otis Skinner. The overall impression one receives from this remarkable plantation is more felt than defined. Integrity, warmth, tradition, and beauty are here in equal measure to be savored by all.

Recently, Margo Bindhardt, Chairman of the Pebble Hill Board of Trustees, received an Award of Stewardship presented by Thomasville Landmarks for the care and preservations of Pebble Hill's buildings and landscape.

The house museum is open to the public.

More info...

Web Site: www.pebblehill.com/

Hawaii

Lyman Mission House

Lyman Mission House
Hilo, Hawaii

In 1832, missionaries David and Sarah Lyman traveled by ship from New England to Hawai`i. They had been married for all of 24 days before leaving on the six-month voyage. In the late 1830s they built the Lyman House as a family home. The Hilo Boarding School, a school for young Hawaiian men founded by the Lymans, was built nearby. Over the years, the house became a place to raise their seven children and host guests, including many of the Hawaiian ali`i (royalty) and other notables such as Mark Twain and Isabella Bird. The Lymans never returned to their native New England, but lived out their long lives in Hilo. The Lyman Mission House is the oldest standing wood structure on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the oldest in the State. It features furniture, tools, household items and artifacts used by the Lymans and other early missionary families. The house is on the State and National Registers of Historic Places and is an important artifact of the Lyman Museum.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.lymanmuseum.org/

Illinois

Bryant Cottage State Historic Site

Bryant Cottage State Historic Site
Bement, Illinois

Bryant Cottage was built in 1856 by Francis E. Bryant (1818-1889), a friend and political ally of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. According to Bryant family tradition, on the evening of July 29, 1858, Douglas and Abraham Lincoln conferred in the parlor of this house to plan the famous Lincoln-Douglas Debates. The picturesque one-story, four-room wood frame cottage has been “restored” and is interpreted as an example of a middle-class life in mid-nineteenth-century Illinois. The furniture on display is of the Renaissance Revival style, appropriate for a small-town family of the mid-nineteenth century.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.illinoishistory.gov/hs/bryant_cottage.htm

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum

Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
Chicago, Illinois

More info...

Web Site: http://www.hullhousemuseum.org

The Richard H. Driehaus Museum

The Richard H. Driehaus Museum
Chicago, Illinois

A must-see attraction for those interested in American architecture, decorative arts, historic preservation, and the history of Chicago.

More info...

Web Site: www.driehausmuseum.org/

Glessner House Museum

Glessner House Museum
Chicago, Illinois

Henry Hobson Richardson's Glessner House was completed in 1887, a year after the architect's untimely death. A radical departure from traditional Victorian architecture, the structure served as an inspiration to the young Frank Lloyd Wright and helped reform domestic architecture.

More info...

Web Site: www.glessnerhouse.org

The Richard H. Driehaus Museum

The Richard H. Driehaus Museum
Chicago, Illinois

The Driehaus Museum is housed in the historic Samuel Mayo Nickerson Mansion. Built from 1879 to 1883, the Marble Palace, as the house became known, was one of the grandest residential buildings of 19th-Century Chicago. Steeped in history, the Nickerson House survives today as one of Chicago’s most extraordinary historic homes.

Described as a “splendid survivor amongst the hulking high-rises of River North,” the Museum is a fascinating showcase for late nineteenth and early twentieth century art and design, displayed against the magnificent backdrop of the newly restored Nickerson Mansion. The Driehaus Museum is a must-see attraction for those interested in American architecture, decorative arts, historic preservation, and the history of Chicago.


www.driehausmuseum.org

More info...

Ellwood House

Ellwood House
DeKalb, Illinois

(This is definitely one of the best home tours I've ever taken. Who knew barbed wire could be so fascinating?! and the home was beautiful!)

More info...

Web Site: http://www.ellwoodhouse.org/

Pierre Menard Home State Historic Site

Pierre Menard Home State Historic Site
Ellis Grove, Illinois

Pierre Menard (1766-1844), a successful French Canadian businessman and fur trader, was presiding officer of the Illinois Territorial Legislature and from 1818 to 1822 served as the first lieutenant governor.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.illinoishistory.gov/hs/pierre_menard.htm

Ulysses S. Grant Home State Historic Site

Ulysses S. Grant Home State Historic Site
Galena, Illinois

The Italianate structure known as the U. S. Grant Home was built in 1859-60 as a residence by Alexander J. Jackson of Galena. When Ulysses S. Grant returned to the city in 1865 as a Civil War hero, he was presented the house—purchased by a group of prominent local Republicans, including Elihu B. Washburne—as part of the city’s celebration. Grant used the home as his official political and voting address, living there with his family during his 1868 presidential campaign, then for a few brief periods during his presidency (1869-1877) and retirement. He visited for the last time in 1880.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.illinoishistory.gov/hs/grant_home.htm

Carl Sandburg Home State Historic Site

Carl Sandburg Home State Historic Site
Galesburg, Illinois

The Carl Sandburg State Historic Site is the birthplace of Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and Lincoln biographer, a children’s author and folk song collector. Son of a Swedish immigrant who worked as a blacksmith’s assistant at the nearby CB&Q railroad shops, Sandburg attended local primary schools and Galesburg’s Lombard College. His first books of poetry were published in Galesburg.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.illinoishistory.gov/hs/carl_sandburg.htm

Fabyan Villa Museum and Japanese Garden

Fabyan Villa Museum and Japanese Garden
Geneva, Illinois

The Fabyan Villa Museum was the home of George and Nelle Fabyan from 1905 - 1939. It was initially their summer home, but shortly after 1907, when they hired Frank Lloyd Wright to enlarge and re-model their home, they decided to make it their permanent residence. Over the next 20 years, their estate grew into a lavish showplace, complete with fountains, swimming pools, gardens, a windmill, private zoo, tennis courts, and more. A visit to the Villa Museum gives visitors an experience of Frank Lloyd Wright architecture, as well as an overview of the unique and fascinating Fabyan story. The Museum contains the Fabyans' collection of Asian artifacts, natural history specimens, Nelle's original Mission-Style bedroom furniture and some surprises!

You will also learn of the Fabyans' contributions to society, country and science, and the generosity they bestowed on residents of the Fox Valley Area.

Their Japanese Garden, first installed c. 1909, is still a tranquil oasis where history melds with nature and theory. This special site affords you the opportunity to simply enjoy a bit of harmony with nature, or to learn principles of Japanese gardening.

The major part of the Fabyan Estate is now the Fabyan Forest Preserve, part of Kane County Forest Preserve District in Illinois. The Villa is on the National Register of Historic Places.

More info...

Web Site: www.ppfv.org/fabyan.htm

B. Harley Bradley House

B. Harley Bradley House
Kankakee, Illinois

Widely acknowledged as Frank Lloyd Wright's first Prairie Style design, the B. Harley Bradley House is now open to the public for tours and private events.

More info...

Web Site: www.wrightinkankakee.org

Mayslake Peabody Estate

Mayslake Peabody Estate
Oak Brook, Illinois

This Tudor revival style mansion was built between 1919-1921 by renowned Chicago architect Benjamin Marshall. It served as the retirement home for Francis. S Peabody, a coal baron and active player in national politics.

The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is currently undergoing restoration and open to the public, thus giving our visitors the unique opportunity to witness restoration in progress.

More info...

Web Site: www.mayslakepeabody.com/

Farnsworth House

Farnsworth House
Plano, Illinois

Designed by Mies van der Rohe and built from 1946 to 1951, Farnsworth House is considered a paradigm of international style architecture in America. The house's structure consists of precast concrete floor and roof slabs supported by a carefully crafted steel skeleton frame of beams, girders and columns.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.farnsworthhouse.org/

Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum

Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum
Rockford, Illinois

Tinker Swiss Cottage Museum is a treasure trove of a time gone by. Rockford, Illinois businessman Robert H. Tinker built the home in 1865, perching it high on a limestone bluff overlooking Kent Creek. His inspiration came from an 1862 tour of Europe where he fell in love with the architecture of Switzerland. Today the Cottage is one of only a handful of Swiss-style homes remaining in the United States from the 1800s.

Tinker surrounded his Swiss Cottage with trees, vines, winding pathways and flower beds. A three-story Barn housed cows, chickens and in later years the family car. On the backside of the Cottage, a suspension bridge crossed Kent Creek and linked the Cottage with Mrs. Tinker's property on the far bank. In 1906, after the railroad bought her estate, Robert Tinker planted elaborate gardens at the end of the bridge.

The Tinker family, the sole occupants of the Swiss Cottage, left their home to the Rockford Park District and their household belongings to trustees after seventy-five years of residence. Filled with original furnishings, artwork, diaries and household items, the Cottage is a rich time capsule of life a century ago.

More info...

Web Site: www.tinkercottage.com/

Dana-Thomas House

Dana-Thomas House
Springfield, Illinois

Springfield's Dana-Thomas House is the best preserved and most complete of Frank Lloyd Wright's early "Prairie" houses. The structure has changed little since its construction in 1902-04 for Springfield socialite and women's activist Susan Lawrence Dana. Read More

More info...

Vachel Lindsay Home State Historic Site

Vachel Lindsay Home State Historic Site
Springfield, Illinois

This site is the birthplace and long-time home of poet (Nicholas) Vachel Lindsay. Lindsay was internationally known in the early-twentieth century for his unique poetry, the artwork he created to illustrate the poetry, and animated performances of his work. Two of his best-known volumes are The Congo (1914) and Collected Poems (1938).

More info...

Web Site: http://www.illinoishistory.gov/hs/vachel_lindsay.htm

Engh Farm--Sycamore History Museum

Engh Farm--Sycamore History Museum
Sycamore, Illinois

More info...

Web Site: www.sycamorehistory.org

The Cuneo Museum

The Cuneo Museum
Vernon Hills, Illinois

The Cuneo Museum was originally the home of Samuel Insull, a partner of inventor Thomas Edison. Insull founded the Commonwealth Edison Company in Chicago and was a pioneer in developing technology for the delivery of electrical services.

In 1914 architect Benjamin Marshall designed the Venetian style mansion and prairie style landscaper Jens Jensen laid out the gardens and park. After Insull's notorious financial collapse, John Cuneo purchased the property. He was best known as founder of the Cuneo Press and the Hawthorn Mellody Dairy. An avid collector, he filled the mansion with artwork, antique furnishings, tapestries, porcelain and silver.

As stipulated in his will, when Mrs. Cuneo died in 1990, the mansion, its collections and the surrounding estate was opened to the public and administered by the Cuneo Foundation.Public tours are conducted daily, except Monday. Concerts, lectures, art fairs and a classic car show are staged in the mansion or on the beautiful grounds. Facilities are available for wedding and party rental as well.

More info...

Web Site: www.cuneomansion.org/

Indiana

Veraestau

Veraestau
Aurora, Indiana

When Jesse Holman combined the Latin words for spring, summer and fall to name his property Veraestau in 1810, he hoped winter would never touch his home. In a way, it never has. Set high above the Ohio River in Aurora, Indiana, the landmark home captures a long sweep of Indiana’s architectural history and exemplifies the historic preservation practiced by generations of two families—the Holman/Hamilton clan and the O’Brien/Gibson familyIn 1810, Holman built a two-story log house with a brick addition and gave it the name of a grand estate. After the log home burned in 1837, Holman's son-in-law Allen Hamilton bought Veraestau, salvaged the remaining brick portion, and in 1838 added a one-story Greek Revival structure. The style was at its height; architectural trendsetters employed Greek Revival to reinforce similarities between the democratic ideals of ancient Greece and the new United States of America. In 1913, Allen’s daughter Margaret Vance Hamilton added a two-story Greek Revival structure that included four bedrooms, a bathroom, a dining room, a kitchen, a breakfast room and two sleeping porches.



More info...

Web Site: www.indianalandmarks.org

Huddleston Farmhouse

Huddleston Farmhouse
Cambridge City, Indiana

Owned and restored by Indiana Landmarks, the 1841 Huddleston Farmhouse museum offered visitors a glimpse of the daily lives of John and Susannah Huddleston and their 11 children, as well as the travelers who crowded the porches and yard and rented the farmhouse’s two “travelers’ kitchens” for cooking and sleeping.

Today the museum is under renovation as the National Road Heritage Site, where expanded exhibits will offer modern-day travelers a vivid picture of cross-country travel on the Historic National Road from Cumberland, Maryland to Vandalia, Illinois -- from the pioneer era to the present.

More info...

Web Site: www.indianalandmarks.org

Lane Place

Lane Place
Crawfordsville, Indiana

Built in 1845, Lane Place was the home of Henry S. and Joanna Lane. Lane was one of the founders of Indiana's Republican Party, chair of the first Republican Nationl Convention, Indiana's 23th governor, and Civil War Senator. Lane helped to secure Abraham Lincoln's nomination for president and was a delegate to Lincoln's funeral. Lane Place has been restored and features many of the original furnishings as well as artifacts related to Abraham Lincoln.

The museum is open for tours March through Mid-December, Wednesday - Friday 10-5 and Sunday 1-5. Lane Place is also the headquarters of the Montgomery County Historical Society, open year round Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 and Sunday 1-5.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.lane-mchs.org/

Ruthmere

Ruthmere
Elkhart, Indiana

The Ruthmere Mansion (formerly the Albert and Elizabeth Beardsley Residence) is a three-story Beaux Arts mansion that is the most prominent historic residence in Elkhart, Indiana. Built in 1910 and refurbished in the early 1970s, the Ruthmere Mansion is now open to the public as a museum.

Ruthmere is located along the St. Joseph River in Elkhart, Indiana. The architect for this home was Enoch Hill Turnock, commissioned by Albert and Elizabeth Beardsley in 1908 to design the home, which the Beardsleys named this home in memory of their only child, Ruth, who died at seven month. ("Mere" reflects the Latin root maris and refers to the home's proximity to water). The mansion was a place of business, family, political and social gatherings until the deaths of the Beardsleys in 1924. Robert Beardsley of The Beardsley Foundation purchased the mansion in 1967 with the main goal of restoring it to its original beauty in order to create a museum for the community. Restoration took place between 1969 and 1973 when the mansion was made available to the public. The property was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The Beardsley Avenue Historic District was established several years later.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.ruthmere.org

Morris-Buttler House

Morris-Buttler House
Indianapolis, Indiana

Immerse yourself in the rich elegance of the Victorian era at the 1865 Morris-Butler House in Indianapolis.

Tours, events, and exhibits at the museum highlight architecture, decorative arts, and family life in the nineteenth century. From the dramatic formal parlor to the private living quarters, you’ll see how an upper-middle-class family and their servants lived in the Victorian era. Rare furnishings fill rooms adorned with stenciled ceilings and elaborate wall-paper and plasterwork. In addition to its magnificent architecture, the museum contains a collection of nineteenth-century sculptures, paintings and lithographs from all over the world.

More info...

Web Site: www.indianalandmarks.org

Howard County Museum

Howard County Museum
Kokomo, Indiana

The musuem is made up of the Seiberling Mansion and the Elliott House, both historic mansions located in Kokomo, IN.

More info...

Web Site: www.howardcountymuseum.org

Lanier Mansion State Historic Site

Lanier Mansion State Historic Site
Madison, Indiana

Lanier Mansion State Historic Site
James Franklin Doughty Lanier was one of Madison’s pioneers. His activities in banking and railroad development made him one of the most important figures in Indiana’s history. Lanier moved to Madison in 1817 and practiced law. In the 1820s he served as clerk of the Indiana General Assembly.

In the 1830s Lanier turned to banking and finance. He became the president and major stockholder of the Madison Branch of the State Bank of Indiana. Lanier promoted railroads and became a major stockholder in Indiana’s first railroad, the Madison and Indianapolis, which was completed in 1847.

Lanier’s business success allowed him to hire Madison architect Francis Costigan to design and build the grandest residence in Madison. It was completed and occupied in 1844. Following the death of his first wife, Elizabeth, in 1846, Lanier married Margaret Mary McClure Lanier in 1848.

In 1849 Lanier formed the investment bank Winslow & Lanier and moved permanently to New York City in 1851, but still maintained close ties to Indiana. During the Civil War he made unsecured loans totaling over $1 million ( $26 million today) enabling Governor Oliver P. Morton to outfit troops and keep up interest payments on Indiana’s debts. By 1870, these loans were repaid with interest. Lanier died in 1881.

The Lanier Mansion is one of the best examples of Greek Revival architecture in the country, and is the "Crown Jewel" of Madison’s Historic District. Features include the stately south portico with colossal Corinthian columns, octagonal cupola and a dramatic spiral staircase. Formal gardens have been recreated using plants popular in the 19th century. Careful restoration and redecoration have recaptured the Mansion’s 19th century splendor. The Lanier Mansion is a National Historic Landmark.

More info...

Web Site: indianamuseum.org/lanier

Copsholm

Copsholm
South Bend, Indiana

This 38 room mansion was built for J. D. Oliver, the president of Oliver Chilled Plow Works. It is owned today by the Center for History, which gives regular tours. The home contains all the original furnishings and artwork.

More info...

Web Site: http://centerforhistory.org/see-and-do/historic-houses/copshaholm-2

Iowa

Salisbury House & Gardens

Salisbury House & Gardens
Des Moines, Iowa

Modeled after the King's House in Salisbury, England, Salisbury House & Gardens was built from 1923-1928. A 42 room country manor estate filled with worldly architectural elements, artwork, tapestries, literary works and nestled atop 9 1/2 acres of virgin woodlands and manicured gardens.

More info...

Web Site: www.salisburyhouse.org

Kansas

The Lebold Mansion

The Lebold Mansion
Abilene, Kansas

Built in 1880 the 23 room Italinate Tuscan Villa Mansion has just under went extensive restoration returning it back to a late 19th century theme. Today the museum is home to some of the finest Victorian artifacts in the Mid west region. Located in the hometown of President Dwight Eisenhower. Open Tuesday -Sunday 10am-4pm closed Mondays Admision charged, Guided tours, Parking, Gift shop.

More info...

Web Site: lebold-mansion.com/

Warkentin House

Warkentin House
Newton, Kansas

The historic Warkentin House is the former home of Bernhard and Wilhelmina Warkentin, built in 1887. It is a splendid example of the Victorian period in American architecture and furnishings. As a museum, the house offers a glimpse into the way the Warkentins lived, since 80 percent of the original furnishings remain. The house is listed on the Kansas and National Registers of Historic Places.

Hours of operation
April-May......Saturday-Sunday 1 pm-4:30 pm
June-Aug.....Tuesday-Sunday 1 pm-4:30 pm
Sept.-Dec....Saturday-Sunday 1 pm-4:30 pm

Admission
Adults........$4.00
Kids 5-12....$2.00
Under 5......free

More info...

Web Site: www.warkentinhouse.org

Louisiana

Hermann-Grima Historic House

Hermann-Grima Historic House
New Orleans, Louisiana

Best example of Federal-style architecture in the French Quarter. Property includes 1831 mansion, large courtyard with slave quarter and working Creole kitchen, and the only intact 19th-century stable in the area.

More info...

Web Site: www.hgghh.org

Gallier House

Gallier House
New Orleans, Louisiana

Built as the private residence of James Gallier, Jr., a well-known New Orleans architect, the house features architectural details that were cutting-edge for the period.

More info...

Web Site: www.hgghh.org

Edgar Degas Foundation

Edgar Degas Foundation
New Orleans, Louisiana


The home of French artist Edgar Degas while on a visit to the US in 1872-73. He was visiting maternal relatives, as his mother and grandmother were natives of Louisiana.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.degas.org/

Longue View House and Gardens

Longue View House and Gardens
New Orleans, Louisiana

Longue Vue House and Gardens, a National Historic Landmark, is one of the last Country Place Era estates to be built. Built from 1939-1942 for philanthropists Edgar Bloom Stern, of New Orleans, and his wife Edith Rosenwald Stern, of Chicago. The combined work of renowned landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman and architects William and Geoffrey Platt created a complete unified plan for the main house and dependences along the eight acre site. Decorated with European and American decorative and fine arts pieces each room was designed to look out and allow egress to a different “garden rooms” blending effortlessly inside and out.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.longuevue.com/

Oak Alley Plantation

Oak Alley Plantation
Vacherie, Louisiana

The quarter-mile canopy of towering 300-year-old live oak trees lining the avenue to the plantation is Oak Alley’s most distinctive feature—but the 28 solid brick columns that line the impressive portico come in at a close second. The 1839 house underwent a major restoration in 1925 when it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Stewart, who sparked a trend of saving old plantations in the area. Oak Alley is open for tours year-round, seven days a week (except certain holidays), from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (The grounds open a half-hour earlier, and the house closes at 4:30 p.m. on weekdays, November through February.) Tickets are $18 for adults; discounts for students and children are available. You can also stay on the grounds in an updated century-old plantation cottage; rates start at $130 per night and include breakfast.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.oakalleyplantation.com/

Maine

Skolfield-Whittier House

Skolfield-Whittier House
Brunswick, Maine

The Skolfield-Whittier House, currently a museum of the Pejepscot Historical Society, once housed three generations of the Skolfield-Whittier family. Built between 1858-1862, the house has been virtually untouched since the last family member moved out in 1925.

Now, the Skolfield-Whittier House is available for tours at 11 am & 2 pm every Thursday, Friday and Saturday from June through Columbus Day. Guests of these tours learn what Victorian life was like for an upper-class Brunswick shipbuilding family. This time capsule of a home is not be missed!

Tours are $5.00 for adults & $2.50 for children 16 and under. AAA discounts DO apply.

More info...

Web Site: http://community.curtislibrary.com/pejepscot/skhse.htm

Maryland

Hammond-Harwood House

Hammond-Harwood House
Annapolis, Maryland

More info...

Web Site: www.hammondharwoodhouse.org

Mount Harmon Plantation

Mount Harmon Plantation
Earleville, Maryland

Mount Harmon Plantation originated as a land grant of 350 acres to Godfrey Harmon by Caecilious Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, in 1651.

During the seventh and eighteenth centuries, Mount Harmon prospered as a tobacco plantation. As you drive down the two-mile lane, through the tunnel formed by Osage orange trees, you will appreciate the isolation of those times, when transportation moved most freely by water. Three of the owners during the period had their own schooners to transport tobacco to the British Isles and return with furnishings and necessities for the house and farm.

James Louttit, a Scotsman who bought Mount Harmon in 1760, called his schooner the "Bee". He, his irish wife Mary George, and their descendants lived in Mount Harmon from 1760 to 1810. Their families' coats of arms are displayed on the gate posts. Subsequently, the plantation passed into another branch of the family.

In 1817, Mount Harmon became the property of Sidney George Fisher. He is known today for his copious diaries in which he describes society, plantation life and agriculture in the nineteenth century. In 1927, at the death of his son, a historian who spelled his name Sydney George Fisher, Mount Harmon passed out of the family.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.mountharmon.org/index.html

Sotterley Plantation

Sotterley Plantation
Hollywood, Maryland

Older than Mount Vernon and Monticello, older than the nation itself, Sotterley Plantation stands majestically on the banks of the Patuxent River. The site encompasses nearly 100 acres of rolling meadows, gardens and shoreline. As the sole surviving Tidewater Plantation in Maryland with public access, Sotterley offers a wide range of visitor activities and educational programming and experiences.

During the 18th century Sotterley grew to 7,000 acres. Using largely slave labor, it produced tobacco, wheat, corn and cotton. Livestock grazed its pastures. Part of the triangular trade routes linking the American colonies with Africa and the West Indies, its 18th-century shipping port was replaced with a busy steamboat landing by the mid-19th-century. Sotterley Plantation was bought and restored during the Colonial Revival in the early 1900s.

Sotterley Plantation, a non-profit, has become not only a treasured National Historic Landmark, but is also an educational site and cultural venue. Hosting thousands of children on site each year, Sotterley provides hands-on learning through its award-winning education programs.

Sotterley’s signature events include the Gala in the Garden, An Independence Day Celebration Concert, Riverside WineFest at Sotterley, Ghosts of Sotterley Tours, Family Plantation Christmas, Holiday Candlelight Tours and the Speaker Series. Sotterley is also a favorite venue for weddings and other private events. Become part of our ongoing history with a membership!
For additional information, please call 301-373-2280 or 800-681-0850.
P.O. Box 67 | 44300 Sotterley Lane
Hollywood, MD 20636 www.sotterley.org
Become a facebook friend of Historic Sotterley!
Blog: www.sotterleyplantation.blogspot.com
Follow us on Twitter

More info...

Web Site: www.sotterley.org

Poplar Hill Mansion

Poplar Hill Mansion
Salisbury, Maryland

Poplar Hill Mansion is a 501 (c) (3) Federal House Museum buit 1795-1805, the oldest documented home in Salisbury. We are open for free tours the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month from 1-4, private tours for a small fee, fundraising events, and available for parties, meetings and weddings. We are listed on the National registry of Historic homes.

More info...

Web Site: www.poplarhillmansion.org

Massachusetts

The Emily Dickinson Museum: The Homestead & The Evergreens

The Emily Dickinson Museum: The Homestead & The Evergreens
Amherst, Massachusetts

The Museum consists of two historic houses in the center of Amherst, Massachusetts, closely associated with the poet Emily Dickinson and members of her family during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Homestead was the birthplace and home of the poet Emily Dickinson. The Evergreens, next door, was home to her brother Austin, his wife Susan, and their three children.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org/

The Nichols House Museum

The Nichols House Museum
Boston, Massachusetts

Amid the beautiful townhouses of Boston’s historic Beacon Hill district stands the home of a remarkable woman, Miss Rose Standish Nichols. Her four story townhouse at 55 Mount Vernon Street was built in 1804 and is attributed to Charles Bulfinch, renowned Boston architect. The Federal style home contains a dazzling array of artwork collected by the Nichols family, from paintings and prints to antique furniture, silver, textiles, and ceramics. This varied collection spans the globe and centuries as well, representing American, Asian, and European art from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Among the many cherished objects in the Museum’s collection are works by Miss Nichols’ uncle, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, America’s foremost sculptor of the 19th century.

Perhaps even more astonishing than her splendid home is the story of Rose Nichols herself. Born in 1872, she was an author, suffragist, lifelong pacifist, and women’s rights activist at a time when women were expected to marry and have children. Miss Nichols chose to do neither, instead supporting herself through a pioneering career in landscape architecture. In fact, she was one of the first women to become a professional landscape designer in the United States. A multi-faceted woman, she also devoted her time to numerous social reform movements and helped found the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom in 1915.

Rose Nichols left her house as a museum so that people could learn about the life of a Boston Brahmin family at the turn of the last century. Since 1961, the Nichols House Museum has been open to the public, offering visitors a glimpse of the unique social history of Beacon Hill during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.nicholshousemuseum.org/

The Paul Rever House

The Paul Rever House
Boston, Massachusetts

Paul Revere owned the home from 1770 to 1800, although he and his family may not have lived here in some periods in the 1780s and 90s. After Revere sold the home in 1800, it soon became a tenement, and the ground floor was remodeled for use as shops, including at various times a candy store, cigar factory, bank and vegetable and fruit business. In 1902, Paul Revere's great-grandson, John P. Reynolds Jr. purchased the building to ensure that it would not be demolished. Over the next few years, money was raised, and the Paul Revere Memorial Association formed to preserve and renovate the building. In April 1908, the Paul Revere House opened its doors to the public as one of the earliest historic house museums in the U.S. The Association still oversees the preservation and day-to-day operations of this national treasure.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.paulreverehouse.org/index.html

The Gibson House Museum

The Gibson House Museum
Boston, Massachusetts

A National Historic Landmark in Boston's Back Bay, home to three generations of the Gibson family from 1859 to 1954. The house has four floors of original interiors and furnishings and is open to the public.

More info...

Web Site: www.thegibsonhouse.org

Francis Wyman Homestead

Francis Wyman Homestead
Burlington, Massachusetts

The Francis Wyman House is generally held to be the oldest surviving landmark in Burlington, MA and is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is open to the public in the summer on the 2nd Sat of the month, May through Sept, and by appointment. For more information please go to www.wymanassociation.org

More info...

Web Site: www.wymanassociation.org

Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site

Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Longfellow House - Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site preserves the home of Henry W. Longfellow, one of the world’s foremost 19th century poets. The house also served as headquarters for General George Washington during the Siege of Boston, July 1775 - April 1776. In addition to its rich history, the site offers unique opportunities to explore 19th century literature and arts.

More info...

Web Site: nps.gov/LONG

Cogswell's Grant

Cogswell's Grant
Essex, Massachusetts

Cogswell's Grant was the summer home of Bertram K. and Nina Fletcher Little, preeminent collectors of American folk art in the mid 20th century. In 1937, the Littles purchased this 18th-century farmhouse overlooking the Essex River as a family retreat and place to entertain. They restored it carefully, preserving original 18th-century finishes and carefully documenting their work. In more than 50 years of collecting, they sought works of strong, even quirky character, and in particular favored objects with their original finishes and New England histories.

The Littles decorated the house for visual delight rather than historic accuracy. The result is rich in atmosphere and crowded with collections of things -- primitive paintings, redware, painted furniture, stacked Shaker boxes, weather vanes and decoys -- that have since come to define the country look.

Open for tours June 1st - Oct. 15th, Wed. - Sun., 11am - 4pm.

Cogswell's Grant is a property of Historic New England, the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive regional preservation organization in the country. It operates thirty-six historic sites, offering unique opportunities to experience the lives and stories of New Englanders through their homes and possessions.
Visit online at HistoricNewEngland.org.

More info...

Web Site: www.historicnewengland.org/visit/homes/cogswell.htm

The Sargent House Museum

The Sargent House Museum
Gloucester, Massachusetts

For over 100 years, the Sargent House Museum was the home of sea merchants, patriots and community leaders. A fine example of high-style Georgian domestic architecture, the house was built in 1782 for Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820), a philosopher, writer and an early advocate of social justice.

Visitors to the Sargent House Museum learn about the early history of Gloucester from its beginnings as a farming and lumbering outpost to its evolution into the country’s premier seaport. Visitors will also see a collection of original works by the great portrait painter John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) who traces his roots back to Judith Sargent Murray and Colonial Gloucester.

More info...

Web Site: http://sargenthouse.org/

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum
Hadley , Massachusetts

The House was built in 1752 by Moses and Elizabeth Porter on a tract of land known as “Forty Acres and its skirts.” These acres had been owned in common by the householders in the northeast quarter of the stockaded town of Hadley when it was laid out in 1659. After the Porter's only child, Elizabeth, married Charles Phelps in 1770, the house was enlarged and refined. Since 1799 there have been no structural changes. Early family members, along with numerous artisans, servants and slaves, made “Forty Acres” an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national networks of the 18th century.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.pphmuseum.org/

The Mount

The Mount
Lenox, Massachusetts

The Mount is both an historic site and a center for culture inspired by the passions and achievements of Edith Wharton. Designed and built by Edith Wharton in 1902, the house embodies the principles outlined in her influential book, The Decoration of Houses (1897). The property includes three acres of formal gardens designed by Wharton, who was also an authority on European landscape design, surrounded by extensive woodlands. Programming at The Mount reflects Wharton’s core interests in the literary arts, interior design and decoration, garden and landscape design, and the art of living. Annual exhibits explore themes from Wharton’s life and work.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.edithwharton.org

Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum

Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum
Lenox, Massachusetts

Ventfort Hall, built by George and Sarah Morgan as their summer home, is an imposing Jacobean Revival mansion that typifies the Gilded Age in Lenox. Sarah, the sister of J.P.Morgan, purchased the property in 1891, and hired Rotch & Tilden, prominent Boston architects, to design the house.

The town of Lenox was the center of the social season in the Berkshires during the Gilded Age, the period between the Civil War and the First World War. Drawn to the Berkshires by artists and writers such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Catherine Sedgwick, Fanny Kemble and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow who had settled here early in the 19th century, as well as the beautiful countryside and scenic views of mountains and lakes, many prominent financiers and industrialists constructed luxurious and imposing summer homes in Lenox and the surrounding area. In fact, Ventfort Hall was one of about seventy-five Berkshire Cottages built in Lenox and Stockbridge during this period.

Ventfort Hall was rescued from demolition in 1997 and has been under restoration since then. Currently, the first floor and a majority of the second floor are open to the public. We have events, lectures, children's programming and more bringing the Gilded Age to life. Please visit us soon!

More info...

Web Site: www.gildedage.org

Stonehurst, The Robert Treat Paine Estate

Stonehurst, The Robert Treat Paine Estate
Waltham, Massachusetts

The country home of social reformer and affordable housing advocate Robert Treat Paine, Stonehurst is an American masterpiece crowning the career-long collaboration between architect Henry Hobson Richardson (Trinity Church, Boston) and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, leading 19th century designers who deeply influenced the way Americans live and relate to their environment, from dense cities to unspoiled wilderness. Hidden from the street on 109 acres of conservation land, Stonehurst is the most intact example of Richardson's innovative approach to country house design and the only one that is open to the public. Built in 1886, the convention-breaking house crowns a spectacular rise selected by Olmsted, founder of the parks movement nationwide. The house also incorporates an older house (1866) recycled and relocated uphill on the site.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.stonehurstwaltham.org/index.html

Michigan

Henry Ford Estate

Henry Ford Estate
Dearborn, Michigan

Return to the world of automotive pioneer Henry Ford at the Henry Ford Estate ~ Fair Lane in Dearborn, Michigan.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.henryfordestate.org/

Whaley House Museum

Whaley House Museum
Flint, Michigan

R. J. and Mary Whaley's home on East Kearsley Street is representative of the establishment of the upper class in Flint, Michigan during the Victorian era. The home exhibits the transition between the community's lumbering and agricultural era to the establishment and rise of heavy industry. R. J. Whaley was the president of Citizens Bank and provided the initial loans that led to the creation of General Motors.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.whaleyhouse.com/index.html

Thumb Octagon Barn

Thumb Octagon Barn
Gagetown, Michigan

The barn is a warehouse and a factory, a place of business, and a storehouse for farm equipment. It is one of the farmer's most important agricultural tools. The barn was originally used for threshing grain, milking cows, and storing hay. But it was also a place for dancing, playing, and courting. It was the heart of the farm and a vital part of the community. Construction of the octagon shaped barn was started in 1923 and was completed in 1924.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.thumboctagonbarn.org/

Straight Farmhouse

Straight Farmhouse
Garden City, Michigan

This 1866 Gothic Revival farmhouse was the family home of Oscar & Mary Straight and their two children. Purchased by Friends of the Garden City Historical Museum in 2004 as a public museum dedicated to the history of early Garden City pioneers.

More info...

Web Site: www.sfhonline.org

Voigt House Victorian Museum

Voigt House Victorian Museum
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Voigt House is an 1895 Chateauesque style mansion built by German immigrant and busnessman, Carl Voigt. His family occupied and preserved the house for 76 years and it contains their original decor, furnishings and possessions. It is a property of the Public Museum of Grand Rapids and is located in Heritage Hill which consists of 1300 homes and buildings, one of the largest areas on the National Register of Historic Places.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.grmuseum.org/voigt_house/

Edsel and Eleanor Ford House

Edsel and Eleanor Ford House
Gross Pointe Shores, Michigan

Edsel & Eleanor Ford House tells the story of the home life of a prominent American family. The Fords were cultural, social and economic leaders in an era of great optimism, as well as a turbulent time of economic depression and world war. They were nationally prominent and they owned more than one house, but Southeast Michigan was their home. Here they built their final residence along the shores of Lake St. Clair, at a place known locally as Gaukler Pointe. Their impressive yet unpretentious home is where they raised and nurtured their four children - Henry II, Benson, Josephine and William - in a safe and loving environment. It reflects their love of family as well as their mutual passion for art and quality design.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.fordhouse.org/index.html

William G Thompson House Museum & Gardens

William G Thompson House Museum & Gardens
Hudson, Michigan

Three generational house with contents. Last resident, W G Thompson collected various antiques and art. Large gardens.

More info...

Web Site: thompsonmuseum.org

Alden B. Dow Home and Studio

Alden B. Dow Home and Studio
Midland, Michigan

The Alden B. Dow Home and Studio in Midland, Michigan, is a masterpiece of contemporary organic architecture. Designed in 1933 by Alden B. Dow, his own home and studio personifies the idea that gardens never end and buildings never begin. It integrates the best elements of nature with the remarkable visions of man-made ingenuity. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989, the Alden B. Dow Home and Studio is shared with the public through educational programming, public and group tours and by researchers utilizing the Alden B. Dow Archives, the on-site repository of Mr. Dow's architectural records.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.abdow.org/index.php/home

Crocker House Museum & Macomb County Historical Society

Crocker House Museum & Macomb County Historical Society
Mount Clemens, Michigan

Joshua Dickinson built this home in 1869, 10 years before he was elected the first mayor of Mount Clemens. He was mayor for only a month before he succumbed to consumption. The town's folk held another election and elected his son-in-law, George Crocker, who lived in this home with him and his daughter Katherine. The Crocker House Museum offers a late Victorian home-life experience reminiscent of the world renowned Mineral Bath Era of Mount Clemens in Macomb County, Michigan.

More info...

Web Site: www.crockerhousemuseum.com

Hackley and Hume Historic Site

Hackley and Hume Historic Site
Muskegon, Michigan

This site preserves the homes of Muskegon's most famous lumber baron, Charles H. Hackley, and his business partner, Thomas Hume. Built between 1887 and 1889, these homes are the finest examples of Queen Anne architecture in the United States. They feature extensive wood carving and stained glass windows. The Hackley House has been restored to its 1889 appearance and the Hume house has been restored to its 1920s appearance.

More info...

Web Site: www.lakeshoremuseum.org

Meadow Brook Hall

Meadow Brook Hall
Rochester, Michigan

Meadow Brook Hall is the fourth largest historic house museum in the United States and is renowned for its superb craftsmanship, architectural detailing and grand scale. Built between 1926 and 1929 as the residence of Matilda Dodge Wilson (widow of auto pioneer John Dodge) and her second husband, lumber broker Alfred G. Wilson, the 110-room, 88,000-square-foot, Tudor-revival style mansion is complete with vast collections of original art and furnishings.

More info...

Web Site: www.meadowbrookhall.org

Minnesota

Glensheen, the historic Congdon estate

Glensheen, the historic Congdon estate
Duluth, Minnesota

A hallmark of extraordinary design. A businessman’s enduring legacy. A showcase of diverse interior styles. But at its very heart, a family home. Welcome to Glensheen, the historic Congdon estate. Along the shore of Lake Superior, a 7.6-acre expanse of wooded land enfolds the 39-room Jacobean Revival mansion that is Minnesota’s premier historic site. The interiors of the mansion have endured, boasting nearly all of the same furnishings and décor that graced the rooms when estate was completed in 1908. Even the formal gardens and naturalistic landscape retain much of their original design. Here, visitors are given a fascinating look at life in an affluent family home from the turn of the last century.

Glensheen is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Partner Place of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

More info...

Web Site: www.glensheen.org

Joseph J. Brechet Home

Joseph J. Brechet Home
Glencoe, Minnesota

Beautiful three-story majestic Bed & Breakfast with a two-story stone foundation, boasting Historic Grandeur.

More info...

Web Site: http://brechetinn.blogspot.com/

James J. Hill House

James J. Hill House
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Amid the titanic figures of America's Gilded Age, James J. Hill was nicknamed "The Empire Builder" for his vast transportation network. While he was finishing the Great Northern Railway, he hired Boston architects Peabody & Stearns to build a new house for his family on fashionable Summit Avenue in St. Paul. When it was completed, the 36,000 square foot house was the largest in Minnesota, with state of the art mechanical systems including indoor plumbing, central heating, and electric and gas lighting.

Today the home is open year-round for tours, art exhibits, and special events. Visitors learn about the life and career of James J. Hill, his family and the servants and staff who worked at the house.

More info...

Web Site: www.mnhs.org/hillhouse

Mississippi

Thistledome Honeysuckle Society

Thistledome Honeysuckle Society
Byhalia, Mississippi

Beautifully renovated, once used as a home as well as a successful Bed & Breakfast.

Thistledome is now a restaurant and Wedding/special events business. Home is on the National Historic register and is located in a National Register Historic District (historic downtown Byahlia).

More info...

Web Site: https://www.facebook.com/thistledome1840

Missouri

Elgin Cottrell House

Elgin Cottrell House
Clarksville, Missouri

The Hezekiah Elgin House (c1845) at 209 South First Street in Clarksville, MO has the honor of being one of the oldest
houses on record in the City of Clarksville and one of a few remaining houses on the River Front.

The Elgin family history in Pike County began with William Elgin who in 1816 bought a 300 acre Spanish Tract said to
extend north and south from Clarksville and west for three quarters of a mile. William’s son, Hezekiah S. Elgin came to
Clarksville in the early 1800’s. He opened a trading post and built one of the first roads between St. Louis and
Clarksville. He also built the Elgin Opera House and Hotel which were both destroyed by fire in the late 1800’s.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.clarksvillemo.us/elgincottrell.html

Rockcliffe Mansion

Rockcliffe Mansion
Hannibal, Missouri

Built between 1898 and 1900 in the Georgian Revival Style, is a massive Gilded-Age grand residence, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Perched on a limestone bluff, overlooking the Mississippi River and the historic town of Hannibal below, its views are spectacular and unmatched.

More info...

Web Site: https://rockcliffemansion.com/

Vaile Mansion

Vaile Mansion
Independence, Missouri

Built in 1881, the Vaile stands as one of our nation’s premiere example of Second Empire Victorian architecture. But that is just the beginning of the story of over a century of history that has unfolded in this house.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.vailemansion.org/Welcome.html

Bingham-Waggoner Estate

Bingham-Waggoner Estate
independence, Missouri

More info...

Web Site: http://bwestate.org/welcome.asp

Campbell House Museum

Campbell House Museum
Saint Louis, Missouri

One of the best-preserved 19th Century townhouses in America, home of renowned fur trader Robert Campbell and his family from 1854 until 1938. Restored to its 1880s high-Victorian opulence, the museum features original family furnishings.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.campbellhousemuseum.org

Chatillon-De Menil House

Chatillon-De Menil House
St Louis, Missouri

Located in the Benton Park neighborhood, the Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion is one of St. Louis' most interesting historic homes.

Originally built in c.1849 by Henri and Odile Chatillon, the house was greatly expanded by the DeMenil family's Greek Revival addition (completed 1863). The Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion features guided tours, a gift shop, and the largest permanent collection of memorabilia from the 1904 World's Fair.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.demenil.org

Montana

Mai Wah Museum

Mai Wah Museum
Butte, Montana

The Mai Wah Museum includes the commercial and living spaces of Chinese residents of Butte, Montana, from 1899 through the 1950s.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.maiwah.org

Conrad Mansion Museum

Conrad Mansion Museum
Kalispell, Montana

1895 home of Kalispell's founding family, Charles and ALicia Conrad, filled with original furnishings, books, toys, clothing and effects.

More info...

Web Site: www.conradmansion.com

Nebraska

Frank House

Frank House
Kearney, Nebraska

The Frank family built their 1889 showcase mansion to amaze their guests and encourage investment in their vision for Kearney as a community of cultural and economic excellence.

The house was the first residence west of the Missouri River to be wired for electricity during construction and still features seven of its original ten fireplaces, English golden oak paneling, hand carved woodwork, and a magnificent staircase that elegantly ascends to an authentic, Tiffany stained glass window.

The University of Nebraska-Kearney preserves, interprets and shares the cultural resources of the Frank House with present and future generations.

Visit us at 2010 University Drive, University of Nebraska-Kearney, 68849 during walk in hours, 2-5 Mon-Fri. and 12-5 Sat. No admission fee; donations appreciated. Arrangements for tours and for all large groups (eight or more people) are by reservation only and are also available outside of the regular museum walk-in hours.

More info...

Web Site: www.frankhouse.org/

New Jersey

Ringwood Manor

Ringwood Manor
1304 Sloatsburg Road , New Jersey

The architecture of Ringwood Manor is truly unique. Unlike the next-door Skylands Manor in the New Jersey State Botanical Gardens, it is an organic house that grew and expanded naturally throughout several important periods in American history, reflecting the characteristics of its inhabitants.

Initially the grounds would have housed Indian Villages and celebrations. Later Cornelius Ogden, Joseph Board, and Peter Hasenclever began the house that Robert, Elizabeth and Ebenezer Erskine lived in during the Revolutionary War. That house was most likely burnt down.

The existing mansion was started in 1807 by the Ryersons and added to by the Hewitts for a period of over 100 years. Thus, the present Ringwood Manor displays architecture from the Federal through the Victorian and Edwardian periods. Each addition is interesting and significant.

The other important factor about Ringwood Manor is that it was left by the Hewitt family as it was: it has their furniture, their books, their clothing. It shows how this family lived during the 19th and 20th centuries.

It is not a magnificent mansion. Its architecture is not a grand display of one period or one architect's ego. It is a story of history, of people, and of life, because the Hewitt family loved this house while they lived in it.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.georgetowncountymuseum.com

Kuser Farm Mansion

Kuser Farm Mansion
Hamilton, New Jersey

The Kuser Farm Mansion has seventeen rooms and sits on a 22-acre farm; the estate was once considerably larger, encompassing 70 acres. Generically considered a Victorian style structure, the mansion contains many of the elements of the Queen Anne style, including a steeply pitched roof and curved porches. The mansion is now furnished with period furniture, including some pieces that are original to the house. According to one source, ?The period rooms in the mansion include the ?Theatre in the Dining Room,? with its once state-of-the-art 18-foot curved Cinema-Scope screen.?(1)

The estate includes several other buildings including a laundry house, coach house, barn, and multiple garages. The mansion is also surrounded by a beautiful garden, which includes gazeboes. The garden is perhaps best known for having one of the best clay tennis courts in the state; in its heyday the court used by visiting celebrities.

Owned and operated by Hamilton Township, Kuser Farm Mansion is open to the public for guided tours; the gardens are also open to the public.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.hamiltonnj.com/content/83865/83889/84090.aspx

The Hermitage

The Hermitage
Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey

The Hermitage, a National Historic Landmark house museum, incorporates a stone structure that was visited during the Revolutionary War by Washington, Hamilton, and Lafayette. It was the site of the marriage of Aaron Burr and Theodosia Prevost in 1782. Its picturesque Gothic Revival design dates to the 1847 remodeling by architect William H. Ranlett.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.thehermitage.org/index.html

The William H. Johnson House

The William H. Johnson House
New Brunswick, New Jersey

The William H. Johnson House (c. 1870) is an NJ State & National Register building named for the New Brunswick craftsperson who first owned it. Johnson lived here with his wife Sarah and daughter Adilade. The house is a wonderful example of Victorian craftsmanship, built by and for New Brunswick residents in the Italianate style, right after the Civil War when New Brunswick experienced a post-war economic boom. Architectural components including the tall narrow windows with arched tops, double bays, cornice brackets, and low pitched roofs exemplify the Italianate style. It is significant because of the high level of integrity of its original decorative components, including some anaglypta wallpaper from the late 1800’s presumed to be hung by William H. Johnson himself. Friends of the William H. Johnson House was founded to preserve the home.

More info...

Web Site: www.fotwhjh.org

New York

Thomas Cole National Historic Site

Thomas Cole National Historic Site
Catskill, New York

Thomas Cole (1801-1848) is the founder of the art movement known as the Hudson River School, establishing an approach to landscape painting that dominated American art for over 50 years. Cole's early paintings of nature untouched by human development reinforced notions of America as a new Eden, and launched America's first indigenous art movement. Today you can visit his Federal style brick home with a magnificent view of the Catskill Mountains, as well as his original studio building, where many of his best known masterpieces were created. Within 15 miles of his home are many of the landscapes that Cole painted, and a map is available to guide you to the views that appear in his paintings.

More info...

Web Site: www.thomascole.org/

Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden

Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden
Flushing, New York

The Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden, through the experience of an immigrant family’s 1890s home, preserves and interprets the cultural and horticultural heritage of Flushing, Queens. The well preserved American Victorian Home was built in 1891 by a speculating shop keeper. In 1899 the home was sold to Conrad Voelker, a German immigrant and publisher of a number of German American newspapers up until WWI. Upon his death in 1930, his daughter Theresa and her husband, Dr. Orth, lived in the house. Their daughter Elisabeth lived in the house until she died in 1995. More than a century old, this house has been the home of a single family for nearly its entire history and has changed little since the days of Conrad Voelcker.

A distinguishing feature of the museum is the garden, containing plants that were once regular favorites in the Victorian era. The garden is maintained using eighteenth century propagation methods and gardening techniques, such as hand pruning and the use of natural fertilizers and pesticides, thus serving as a sanctuary for a variety of migrating birds. In June and July, our butterfly bush attracts monarchs, swallowtails, and other species, and our bee hive is home to a thriving colony of honey bees which produce a modest amount of honey for our educational programs.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.vomuseum.org/

Rose Hill Mansion

Rose Hill Mansion
Geneva, New York

Experience a taste of life on a 19th-century estate at this National Historic Landmark overlooking Seneca Lake. Explore farm and family on a guided tour of the 21-room furnished Greek Revival Mansion. Includes a gift shop and garden. Open May 1-October 31. Closed Mondays. Owned and operated by the Geneva Historical Society.

More info...

Web Site: www.genevahistoricalsociety.com

Frederic Church's Olana State Historic Site

Frederic Church's Olana State Historic Site
Hudson, New York

The eminent Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900) designed Olana, his family home, studio, and estate as an integrated environment embracing architecture, art, and landscape. Considered one of the most important artistic residences in the United States, Olana is a landmark of Picturesque landscape gardening with a Persian-inspired house at its summit, embracing unrivaled panoramic view of the vast Hudson Valley

More info...

Web Site: www.olana.org

Stepping Stones, the historic home of Bill and Lois Wilson

Stepping Stones, the historic home of Bill and Lois Wilson
Katonah, New York

Stepping Stones is the historic home of Bill and Lois Wilson, respective co-founders of Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon Family Groups. Bill and Lois Wilson lived here from 1941, and it is where Bill produced many of his accomplishments that led him to be considered one of the last century's 100 most important people.

The house is left in the form of a museum, exactly as Lois Wilson left it upon her death in 1988. Stepping Stones is open by appointment and guided tours are 6 days a week at 1pm with a reservation.

More info...

Web Site: www.steppingstones.org

Edward Hopper House Art Center

Edward Hopper House Art Center
Nyack, New York

Edward Hopper House Art Center is the birthplace and childhood home of artist Edward Hopper. The house, built in 1858, is on the National Register of Historic Places. It now services as a multi-arts center featuring exhibits of contemporary art, with a small section devoted to the life and work of Edward Hopper (no original Hopper works are in the house)

More info...

Web Site: www.hopperhouse.org/

SAGAMORE HILL

SAGAMORE HILL
Oyster Bay, New York

Sagamore Hill was the home of Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States, from 1885 until his death in 1919. During Roosevelt's time in office, his "Summer White House" was the focus of international attention. Otherwise, it was the home of a most remarkable fellow and his interesting family.

More info...

Web Site: www.nps.gov/sahi/index.htm

Peter Augustus Jay House

Peter Augustus Jay House
Rye, New York

JAY HERITAGE CENTER – 1838 Peter Augustus Jay House

The Jay Property in Rye is the boyhood home of New York State’s only native Founding Father, John Jay (1745-1829). Located in Rye, next to a marshlands preserve with public trails, this sylvan and historic 23 acre park is all that remains of the original 400 acre Jay family estate where America’s first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and author of The Jay Treaty grew up. Located just 35 minutes from Manhattan, the Property has an 8000 year old scenic vista of Long Island Sound over a meadow bordered by sunken stone ha-ha walls, a European garden design feature added by Jay’s eldest son circa 1822. It is also located on the historic Boston Post Road where mile marker “24” out of 230, designated in 1763 by Jay’s colleague, Benjamin Franklin, is set into the perimeter wall.

More info...

Web Site: www.jaycenter.org/

Southampton Historical Museum

Southampton Historical Museum
Southampton, New York

The Rogers Mansion was built by Captain Albert Rogers in 1843, at the peak of the whaling industry. The property had been in his family since 1648. In 1898 Samuel L. Parrish, a wealthy NYC attorney and land developer purchased the home and added many colonial-revival additions. The Museum acquired the one-acre property in 1952 and began adding historic 19th century trade shops and a barn, saving them from destruction. Today the Rogers Mansion Museum Complex has 12 historic buildings listed on the National Registrar of Historic Places. The Rogers Mansion is open Feb-Dec. The Museum also manages three other historic properties. The Pelletreau Silver Shop at 80 Main Street was built in 1686 and is the oldest continuously opened trade shop in the Americas. It is open year-round. The Thomas Halsey Homestead at 179 South Main Street has a 1666 first period house open to visitors during the summer. Conscience Point Historic Marker and Nature Walk is located on North Sea Road in North Sea, NY. The five acre wildlife preserve is open sunrise to sunset and has a shellfish hatchery with education programs during the summer.

More info...

Web Site: www.southamptonhistoricalmuseum.org

Lyndhurst

Lyndhurst
Tarrytown, New York

Lyndhurst is one of America's finest Gothic Revival mansion and a remarkable example of the Hudson River's grand and historic estates. Lyndhurst has always been a place to escape the city and to enjoy the spectacular beauty of the Hudson River and the peaceful surroundings of the country.

More info...

Web Site: www.lyndhurst.org

North Carolina

Biltmore Estate

Biltmore Estate
Asheville, North Carolina

Four of the most fascinating acres at Biltmore Estate are all under one roof. America's largest home boasts 250 rooms, 65 fireplaces, an indoor pool, bowling alley, priceless art and antiques.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.biltmore.com/

Thomas Wolfe House

Thomas Wolfe House
Asheville, North Carolina

More info...

Web Site: http://www.wolfememorial.com/

The Whalehead Club at Currituck Heritage Park

The Whalehead Club at Currituck Heritage Park
Corolla, North Carolina

Art Nouveau architecture at it's finest- this 21,000 sq. ft. home was built in 1920s by Mr. & Mrs. E. C. Knight, Jr., as a winter residence. Avid waterfowl hunters the Knights' home displays custom light fixtures by Louis Comfort Tiffany and a custom mahogany Steinway piano, and so much more!

More info...

Web Site: www.whaleheadclub.org/

Blandwood

Blandwood
Greensboro, North Carolina

Blandwood is one of the America's great historic homes, representing the ideals of progressive North Carolina Governor John Motley Morehead and serving as a protype for one of America's most popular architectural styles in the nineteenth century.

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Web Site: www.blandwood.org

Harper House/Hickory History Center

Harper House/Hickory History Center
Hickory, North Carolina

More info...

Web Site: http://catawbahistory.org/

Latta Plantation

Latta Plantation
Huntersville, North Carolina

Historic Latta Plantation is a circa 1800 cotton plantation and living history farm, located within Latta Plantation Nature Preserve. Tours of the Latta home are guided, and tours of the grounds are self-guided.

More info...

Web Site: http://lattaplantation.org/latta/index.php?page=Contact

Mendenhall Homeplace

Mendenhall Homeplace
Jamestown, North Carolina

Richard Mendenhall's c. 1811 home exemplifies the community of Quaker tradespeople and farmers who actively opposed slavery, promoted education for all, and labored to create a life of peace and simplicity during troubled times.

In addition to the Mendenhall House, you will see an early 19th century medical school, a historic Pennsylvania-style bank barn, an authentic well house/milk house, a one-room schoolhouse and a representative Native American village.

More info...

Web Site: www.mendenhallplantation.org

Körner’s Folly

Körner’s Folly
Kernersville, North Carolina

Körner’s Folly… “The Strangest House in the World” as described in 1997 by Preservation magazine. This undeniably unique house is a creative wonder of artistry, workmanship, and design. Located in Kernersville, the Heart of the Triad, Körner’s Folly is the showcase home of decorator, designer, and painter Jule Gilmer Körner. Famous for the creation of, and the painting of Bull Durham bulls across the U.S., Jule was the head of a growing interior decoration business, at the age of 27, when he began to build his combination bachelor’s quarters, artists’ studio, office, billiard room, carriage house and stables, in 1878. Before long, neighbors and passersby were stopping to gaze at this strange structure rising toward the sky. It is said that one such day, a cousin to Jule was passing by and paused, he then made the comment to one of the construction workers, “Twenty years from now, this house will surely be Jule Körner’s folly.” The construction worker repeated the comment to Jule, thinking he could stir a family riff, but the quick witted Jule was so charmed by this description, he chose to call his home Körner’s Folly. The name is even set in the tiles outside the front door.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.kornersfolly.org/index.html

Fort Defiance

Fort Defiance
Lenoir, North Carolina

This exquisite 1792 home was built by Revolutionary War hero, General William Lenoir and named for a frontier fort that stood nearby. The home has been fully restored to its late 18th, early 19th century splendor. Considered to be one of the most unique restorations in the country, the home still contains more than 300 pieces of its original furnishings and artifacts. It was lived in continously by the Lenoir family until 1961.

More info...

Web Site: http://fortdefiancenc.org/

Bellamy Mansion Museum of History and Design Arts

Bellamy Mansion Museum of History and Design Arts
Wilmington, North Carolina

The Bellamy Mansion is one of North Carolina's most spectacular examples of antebellum architecture built on the eve of the Civil War by free and enslaved black artisans, for John Dillard Bellamy, physician, planter and business leader; his wife, Eliza McIlhenny Harriss and their nine children. After the fall of Fort Fisher in 1865, Federal troops commandeered the house as their headquarters during the occupation of Wilmington. Now the house is a museum that focuses on history and the design arts and offers tours, changing exhibitions and an informative look at historic preservation in action.

More info...

Web Site: www.bellamymansion.org

Burgwin-Wright House and Gardens

Burgwin-Wright House and Gardens
Wilmington, North Carolina

Built in 1770 as a gentleman's town house. General Cornwallis resided here during the American Revolution.

More info...

Web Site: www.burgwinwright.com

Reynolda House Museum of American Art  Reynolda House Museum of American Art

Reynolda House Museum of American Art Reynolda House Museum of American Art
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Former country estate of R.J. and Katherine Smith Reynolds, the mansion was built in 1917 along with formal gardens and a full village. Now it is part of the Reynolda Historic District well within the city limits of Winston-Salem, N.C. The collection is famous for masterpieces from 3 centuries.

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Web Site: http://www.reynoldahouse.org/index.php

Single Brothers House  Single Brothers House

Single Brothers House Single Brothers House
Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Part of the Old Salem restoration, the Single Brothers House was built in 1769 and housed the single men of the Moravian town of Salem, N.C. (now part of Winston-Salem). The house is part of one of the nation's largest and most authentic living history restorations, which includes many other 18th century buildings that were part of the colonial town.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.oldsalem.org/

North Dakota

Former Governors' Mansion State Historic Site

Former Governors' Mansion State Historic Site
Bismark, North Dakota

Located at 320 E. Ave. B in Bismarck, the site consists of a large two and one-half story, restored Victorian house and a carriage house. Constructed in 1884, it housed 20 chief executives between 1893 and 1960. Unique room exhibits feature the restoration process, architectural style changes, and furniture used by several governors. In 1975 the State Historical Society of North Dakota was given the house with the hope that it would operate as a historic house museum..

More info...

Web Site: http://www.history.nd.gov/historicsites/fgm/index.html

Ohio

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens

Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens
Akron, Ohio

In 1896, F.A. Seiberling founded The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, naming it after Charles Goodyear, the inventor of the vulcanization process for rubber. It was the turn of the twentieth century and the Industrial Age was forming modern America where cities grew and industries flourished. Akron, Ohio was no exception -- it built its foundation on the rubber industry to become the "Rubber Capital of the World."

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Web Site: http://www.stanhywet.org/

John Stark Edwards House Museum

John Stark Edwards House Museum
Warren, Ohio

The Edwards House is the oldest frame house in Warren, Ohio. The interior was restored and slightly modified in 1938 when it was donated to the Trumbull County Historical Society. In 1986 it was moved a few blocks north to its present location in the historic district. Mr. Edwards was a pioneer young lawyer who was named the first Recorder of Trumbull County in 1800, which comprised the whole Connecticut Western Reserve of 3 million acres of land. He built this house for his new bride Louisa Maria Morris of Vermont. They had 3 children with only one, William Edwards, living to maturity. Mr. Edwards met an untimely death in 1813 after having been elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1812. Only two other families lived in the house, Atty. Thomas Denny Webb, first publisher of a newspaper, "The Trump of Fame," and Dr. William Iddings who had married Laura Webb and whose children turned the house over to the State of Ohio. This house museum of 19th century life serves as the headquarters of the Trumbull County Historical Society and is open to the public, 2-4, the first Sunday of every month, or the second Sunday when it conflicts with a national holiday. It is open for private tours by appointment. Membership to the Society is available through its website. It is also on Facebook.

More info...

Web Site: www.trumbullcountyhistory.org

Oklahoma

The Frank Phillips Home

The Frank Phillips Home
Bartlesville, Oklahoma

This elegant 26-room mansion was home to oil tycoon, Frank Phillips, founder of Phillips Petroleum Company. Guided tours of the Home allow visitors to see the beautiful original furnishings and hear stories about the Phillips family the history of the Home and the early oil industry in Indian Territory. The Home is open Wed-Sat from 10 am to 5 pm

More info...

Web Site: www.frankphillipshome.org

The Marland Mansion

The Marland Mansion "The Palace on the Prairie"
Ponca City, Oklahoma

The Marland story is fascinating and his home is an architectural wonder. It was designed and constructed as a showplace for pieces of fine art and in the process, it became a masterpiece in its own right.

This National Historic Landmark took three years to construct, 1925 to 1928. The mansion is 78 feet wide and 184 feet long, and contains 43,561 square feet distributed over four levels. There are 55 rooms, including 10 bedrooms, 12 bathrooms, 7 fireplaces, and 3 kitchens. It takes 861 light bulbs to light the mansion.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.marlandmansion.com/

Oregon

The Flavel House Museum

The Flavel House Museum
Astoria, Oregon

As one of the best preserved examples of Queen Anne architecture in the Northwest, the Flavel House survives today as a landmark of local and national significance. The house was built in 1884-85, for Captain George Flavel and his family. The Captain, who made his fortune through his occupation as a river bar pilot and through real estate investments, built the Flavel House as his retirement home at the age of 62. The Flavel House has been restored to accurately portray the elegance of the Victorian period and the history of the Flavel family.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.cumtux.org/default.asp?pageid=35&deptid=1

The Flippin Castle

The Flippin Castle
Clatskanie, Oregon

The Flippin House National Historic Site locally and affectionately known as The Castle is build high on a hill above the town of Clatskanie on Highway 30 just 60 miles from Portland and 35 miles from Astoria. The original owners of The Castle were Thomas and Florence Flippin who established the West Oregon Lumber mill where Tom began saving the best lumber for the grand house he was determined to build in Clatskanie. When their children were old enough to go to school, they purchased property adjacent to the school and construction began on this Victorian-style mansion in 1898. The Flippin family, which included two sons and a daughter, moved in to the house in 1900. To Thomas Flippin, building this house represented his moving up in society as a prosperous lumber man, but to his wife Florence, who had also worked in their lumber company; it represented a refined way of life that she disliked. After living there only three years, the couple moved out, and then separated. Later owners of The Castle included the Hempel and Holman families. For many years in the middle part of the 20th century, The Castle was divided into apartments. In the early 1970’s it was purchased by George and Ann Salmi and was sold to the Clatskanie Senior Citizens Inc. in 1979 who own it today.

The house museum is open to the public.

More info...

Web Site: www.twrps.com/ccor/castle.html

The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House  The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House

The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House The Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House
Eugene, Oregon

The Shelton McMurphey Johnson House was built in 1888 on a hill overlooking the city of Eugene, Oregon. The three families who occupied the house witnessed and contributed to the transformation of Eugene from a frontier farming town to a thriving education and commercial center. Known in its day as the "Castle on the Hill," the Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House stands as a classic example of Queen Anne-style Victorian mansion of the late 19th century. The house is now owned by the city and administered by the non-profit Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson Associates. It is open for viewing at scheduled times and for special tours by appointment.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.smjhouse.org/SMJHouse/Home.html

Hoover-Minthorn Museum House

Hoover-Minthorn Museum House
Newberg, Oregon

The Hoover-Minthorn House was built in 1881 by Jesse Edwards and is the first residence built and still standing in what is now Newberg, Oregon. For the years 1885-1889, the house was the home of Herbert Hoover, 31st President of the United States.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.nscda.org/museums/oregon.htm#HOOVER

Burrows House Museum

Burrows House Museum
Newport, Oregon

Built in 1895 as a home for newlyweds Susan and John Burrows, both in their 60s. The house was originally located at Alder and the Coast Highway. At the time, it was isolated and surrounded by dense shore pine. Its location between the Bayfront and Nye Beach earned it the nickname "The Half-Way House." The Bank of Newport purchased the property and house in 1976 and donated the house to the Lincoln County Historical Society which moved the building to its current location next to the Log Cabin Museum. The building officially became a museum with an open house and dedication on Sunday, September 24, 1978.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.oregoncoast.history.museum/burrowshouse.html

McLoughlin House

McLoughlin House
Oregon City, Oregon

The McLoughlin House, in Oregon City, Oregon, was added to the National Park System in 2003 as a unit of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The house is restored to help recognize the life and accomplishments of John McLoughlin, the "Father of Oregon." The site also includes the home of the family of Dr. Forbes Barclay, a Hudson's Bay Company associate and early Oregon City civic leader.

More info...

Web Site: www.nps.gov/fova

Pittock Mansion

Pittock Mansion
Portland, Oregon

Discover Portland's Living Legacy. 100 years old. 1000 feet up. 23 treasure-filled rooms. No other place in town offers a more breathtaking view and revealing glimpse of Portland’s past.

More info...

Web Site: pittockmansion.org

Pittock Mansion

Pittock Mansion
Portland, Oregon

The Pittock Mansion was home to Portland pioneers Henry and Georgiana Pittock from 1914 to 1919. During the late 1800s and the early 1900s, their lives and work paralleled the growth of Portland from a small Northwest town site to a thriving city with a quarter million population. With its eclectic architectural design and richly decorated interior, including family artifacts, the Pittock Mansion stands today as a living memorial of this family’s contributions to the blossoming of Portland and its people.

More info...

Web Site: http://pittockmansion.org/

Asahel Bush House Museum

Asahel Bush House Museum
Salem, Oregon

Bush House typifies a Victorian home in the truest sense of that word. Built by Asahel Bush II in 1877-78 and occupied by members of his family for the next seventy-five years, the house remains theirs in spirit. In fact, much of what once belonged to Asahel and his four children can still be found in their home, as it did in the family's day. Bush House plays a significant part in the Salem Community - - the pleasant ambiance instilled by the Bushes continues to delight all who visit this wonderful residence.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.oregonlink.com/bush_house/index.html

Historic Deepwood Estate

Historic Deepwood Estate
Salem, Oregon

Historic Deepwood Estate is an 1894 Queen Anne Victorian Home situated on approximately 4 acres of manicured gardens and nature trails set in the heart of Salem near its downtown core. The home was placed on the National Register of Historic Homes in 1973. The museum is operated by the Friends of Deepwood, a non-profit organization created to disseminate information about the home and document life in Victorian times.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.historicdeepwoodestate.org/

Pennsylvania

Cairnwood Estate

Cairnwood Estate
Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania

Designed by the renowned architectural firm of Carrére and Hastings to be a home for the industrialist John Pitcairn and his young family, Cairnwood evokes the grandeur of the Gilded Age with its intimacy, beauty and elegance.

More info...

Web Site: www.cairnwood.org

Cairnwood Estate

Cairnwood Estate
Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania

Designed by the renowned architectural firm of Carrére and Hastings to be a home for the industrialist John Pitcairn and his young family, Cairnwood evokes the grandeur of the Gilded Age with its intimacy, beauty and elegance.

More info...

Web Site: www.cairnwood.org

Glencairn Museum

Glencairn Museum
Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania

Glencairn was the home of Raymond and Mildred Pitcairn. Raymond Pitcairn, who designed his home had no formal training in architecture, had supervised the erection of the acclaimed Bryn Athyn Cathedral, a Gothic and Romanesque style complex. Glencairn, above all a home, was also designed to house Pitcairn's outstanding collection of medieval objects, many of which had been purchased as inspirational models for the craftsmen at the Cathedral. After Mildred Pitcairn passed away in 1979, Glencairn was given to the Academy of the New Church to house its museum collection. Glencairn is now a National Historic Landmark which serves as a museum of the history of religion, serving the Academy of the New Church schools and the broader public.

Glencairn Museum has tours weekdays at 2:30pm and on Saturdays at 1, 1:30, 2:30 and 3:00pm.
Admission for tours: Adults: $8.00; Seniors (65+)/Students with I.D. $6.00; children 4 years and under free.

More info...

Web Site: www.glencairnmuseum.org

Compass Inn Museum

Compass Inn Museum
Laughlintown, Pennsylvania

The Compass Inn started out as a drover's inn along an offshoot of historic Forbes Road near Ligonier, Pennsylvania. By 1820, the structure featured a 'luxurious' stone addition and several outbuildings which helped serve thousands of stagecoach travelers on the Philadelphia-Pittsburgh Turnpike, now historic Lincoln Highway/Route 30.
We feature an operating outdoor cookhouse and blacksmith shop. Don't miss a visit to the barn where we house an authentic antique stagecoach, freight wagon and original six-horse team hitch. We have demonstrators and featured speakers throughout the summer during our living history events which take place in June, July and August. Stop by our unique museum shop which features country-themed gifts for the young and young-at-heart.
Regular tours of Compass Inn are available May through October, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday (last tour at 3 p.m.) We feature candlelight tours of the museum weekends November through mid-December. Tours are $9 for adults, and $6 for visitors ages 6-16. Free admission for children under age 6.

More info...

Web Site: www.compassinn.com

The Baldwin-Reynolds House

The Baldwin-Reynolds House
Meadville, Pennsylvania

The Baldwin-Reynolds House Museum is the 1840s home of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Henry Baldwin. Baldwin, a Jackson appointee, became a major American historical figure from the time of Jackson's first (unsuccessful) presidential campaign in 1824 until Baldwin's death in 1844. After Baldwin's death, the home served as a girl's school for three years before being sold to Baldwin's nephew and founder of the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad, William Reynolds. The home is on the National Register of Historic Places and is open for tours during summer months.

More info...

Web Site: www.baldwinreynolds.org/

Falling Water

Falling Water
Mill Run, Pennsylvania

Fallingwater is recognized as one of Wright's most acclaimed works, and in a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects, it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." It is a supreme example of Frank Lloyd Wright's concept of organic architecture, which promotes harmony between man and nature through design so well integrated with its site that buildings, furnishings, and surroundings become part of a unified, interrelated composition. Wright embraced modern technology to achieve this, designing spaces for living which expressed architecturally the expansive freedom of the American frontier.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.fallingwater.org/

Mount Pleasant Mansion

Mount Pleasant Mansion
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Scottish ship captain John Macpherson (1726–1792) and his first wife, Margaret, built their grand country estate on this site—high atop cliffs overlooking the Schuylkill River—between 1762 and 1765. They employed as their builder-architect Thomas Nevell (1721–1797), an apprentice of Edmund Woolley, the builder of Independence Hall.

Both Macpherson and Nevell intended to make a bold statement with this house. Macpherson could announce his ambition to join established Philadelphia society, whose greatest city houses Mount Pleasant certainly rivaled. Nevell hoped to demonstrate his considerable craft and architectural knowledge. Together, they built one of the grandest homes along the Schuylkill, one that John Adams, on a visit to the residence in 1775, declared "the most elegant seat in Pennsylvania." Today, Mount Pleasant is considered one of the greatest American houses of its type, still standing on its original site in what is now Fairmount Park.

The breath-taking beauty of the house’s interiors and vistas, the elegance of the lifestyle of colonial elites, and the curiosities of Captain Macpherson’s life are all on display at Mount Pleasant. The rooms in this colonial masterpiece feature the craftsmanship of some of the leading Philadelphia artisans, such as carver Martin Jugiez.

Governed by the Fairmount Park Commission Administered by the Philadelphia Museum of Art

More info...

Web Site: http://www.philamuseum.org/visit/20-568-37.html

Cedar Grove Mansion

Cedar Grove Mansion
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Cedar Grove, which was moved from its original site in the Frankford section of Philadelphia to Fairmount Park in 1926–1928, served as a summer residence for five generations of the Coates, Paschall, and Morris families of Philadelphia. In 1746, Elizabeth Coates Paschall, a widow with three children, purchased the property and within a few years began construction on a small summer house of grey native stone, consisting of the present dining room, upper bed chamber and back rooms. Cedar Grove began to evolve as the result of numerous additions made to it by succeeding generations of the family. Through the generosity of Lydia Thompson Morris, the last of the family to possess Cedar Grove, the house and its surviving original furnishings were presented to the city of Philadelphia in 1928.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.philamuseum.org/visit/20-566-41.html

Clayton

Clayton
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

"Clayton is a triumph of restoration," wrote Susan Mary Alsop in Architectural Digest. It is also a triumph of preservation. When the Frick family moved to New York in 1905, after living at Clayton for 22 years, they left much of their Pittsburgh life behind. An astonishing 93% of the artifacts in the house are original, making Clayton a home more than a house, and an eloquent evocation of the lives of the family who lived there. Clayton has welcomed hundreds of thousands of visitors since it was opened to the public in 1990 after a four-year restoration.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.frickart.org/index.php

The Caleb Pusey House

The Caleb Pusey House
Upland, Pennsylvania

Built in 1683 and occupied by Caleb Pusey, this is the only building still standing which can claim documented association with the Proprietor, William Penn, and which he is known to have visited on several occasions. This unique English Vernacular house stands beside Race Street, the small road once paralleling the millrace that brought water from Chester Creek to power the mills.

"Landingford" was the name Pusey gave to the 100 - acre plantation adjoining the mill site which Penn had deeded to him and which he cultivated to raise food for his large family.

Pusey had come to Pennsylvania in 1682 to serve Penn as manager and agent for the Chester Mills, the first official Proprietary saw and grist mill to be established by Penn in the colony.

More info...

Web Site: calebpuseyhouse.home.comcast.net

South Carolina

Heyward House Historic Center

Heyward House Historic Center
Bluffton, South Carolina

This is a house built in 1841 and was occupied until 1998. It is currently owned by the Bluffton Historical Preservation Society and operated currently as Bluffton's only house museum and welcome center.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.heywardhouse.org/hh/index

Rose Hill Mansion

Rose Hill Mansion
Bluffton , South Carolina

Rose Hill Plantation House/ Rose Hill Mansion is a history house museum open for tours and can be rented for weddings and events by calling (843) 757-6046.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.rosehillmansion.com/RoseHillMansion.html

Hampton-Preston Mansion

Hampton-Preston Mansion
Columbia, South Carolina

One of Columbia's oldest remaining historic houses, the Hampton-Preston Mansion was home to many people for 150 years. The city residence of Columbia's Hampton and Preston elite planter-class families, this historic site featured gardens nationally renowned for their size and variety of plantings.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.historiccolumbia.org/site/houses/hamptonpreston-mansion-gardens/overview/index

Woodburn Historic House

Woodburn Historic House
Pendleton, South Carolina

Woodburn was built before 1830 by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney as a summer plantation house on a 650 acre farm near Pendleton, SC in the SC "Upstate". The house is a majestic four-story clapboard house with expansive two-story "piazzas", high-ceilings, oversized doors and windows and is reflective of the architectural tradition of Caribbean plantaion houses built for coolness. The house was occupied by the wealthy Charleston families (Pinckneys, Adgers, Smythes) as a summer retreat for 80 years before being converted to a tenant farm with multiple families occupying the Big House. The farm was the birthplace of Jane Edna Harris Hunter, the daughter of former slaves, who became a leading activitist and reformer in her adopted home of Cleveland, OH. The house was restored in the 1970's by the Pendleton Historic Foundation and is operated as a house museum with multiple outbuildings and walking trails interpreting live on the farm.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.pendletonhistoricfoundation.org/

South Dakota

Pettigrew Home and Museum

Pettigrew Home and Museum
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

The Pettigrew Home and Museum was built in 1889 by a local Sioux Falls family, the McMartins. South Dakota's first State Senator purchased the home in 1911 as a retirement home. He built a museum on the back of the home in 1923 and when he passed away in 1926 willed the Museum and Home to the City of Sioux Falls. The House is open for guided tours and there are exhibit galleries in the Museum addition.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.siouxlandmuseums.com/museums/index.asp

Tennessee

Athenaeum Rectory

Athenaeum Rectory
Columbia, Tennessee

Athenaeum Rectory is all that remains of an extraordinary school for girls which flourished from 1852 to 1904. The Moorish Gothic architecture of the Rectory sets it apart from all other buildings in the area. Architect Adolpus Heiman designed the home for Samuel Polk Walker, nephew of President James K. Polk. In 1837 the house was completed and became the home of The Reverend Mr. Franklin Gillette Smith who came to the area to be president of another school the Columbia Female Institute. In 1851 Smith resigned from the Institute to found the Columbia Athenaeum School and the Smith family home continued to be in the Athenaeum Rectory.

More info...

Web Site: www.athenaeumrectory.com

Doak House Museum

Doak House Museum
Greeneville, Tennessee

The Doak House Museum is the home of Samuel Witherspoon Doak, the founder of Tusculum College, Tenneessee's oldest school.

More info...

Web Site: http://doakhouse.tusculum.edu

Crescent Bend House and Gardens

Crescent Bend House and Gardens
Knoxville, Tennessee

Historic Crescent Bend House & Gardens is one of the Southeast’s finest house museums and gardens. Built in 1834 by Drury Paine Armstrong, Crescent Bend was once a 900 acre working farm and so named for its prominent setting overlooking a majestic crescent bend in the Tennessee River just west of downtown Knoxville, Tennessee.

The Armstrong-Lockett House Museum at Crescent Bend contains an extensive fine antique art and furniture collection from notable artisans like Michael Allison, Honore Launnier, Benjamin Frothingham, Samuel McIntire, and Sir Thomas Lawrence. Also on display is an outstanding American and English Silver collection dating back to the 16th century with eminent silversmiths like Paul de Lamerie, Paul Storr, and seven women silversmiths that includes the works of Elizabeth Godfrey and Hester Bateman. Visitors will be able to discover the mystery behind the hidden trap door of this historic home and hear the tale of how the Jean Zuber wallpaper made its’ travels to Crescent Bend by the way of a United States President and a Pirate.

The William P. Toms Memorial Garden at Crescent Bend is a three-acre formal Italian terraced pleasure garden that overlooks the Tennessee River. Visitors can stroll among the nine terraced gardens of Japanese Maples, Roses, Conifers, Perennials and thousands of colorful blooming annuals that are set to the backdrop of the dancing waters from five large fountains.

More info...

Web Site: www.crescentbend.com

Falcon Rest Mansion and Gardens

Falcon Rest Mansion and Gardens
McMinnville, Tennessee

Falcon Rest is the Victorian mansion where history is fun. It was built in 1896 by 'Gorilla Pants' manufacturer Clay Faulkner, who promised his wife "the grandest mansion in Tennessee" if she would move near his woolen mill. Called "Tennessee's Biltmore" by PBS, Falcon Rest had all the "modern conveniences" - electric lights, indoor plumbing, central heat and more. Today, it is filled with museum-quality Victorian antiques, and some say it's presided over by a friendly ghost - perhaps the proud builder himself. Falcon Rest's Victorian Gift Shop, with over 3,000 items that could have been in the mansion in the 1890s, has been called an attraction in itself. Delicious lunches are offered in the Tea Room for walk-ins daily. Special interactive, history-based entertainment shows with meals and mansion tours are available for tour groups by reservation. Located in McMinnville, "the nursery capital of the world," halfway between Nashville and Chattanooga. Open daily year round 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

More info...

Web Site: www.falconrest.com

The Hermitage, Home of President Andrew Jackson  The Hermitage, Home of President Andrew Jackson

The Hermitage, Home of President Andrew Jackson The Hermitage, Home of President Andrew Jackson
Nashville, Tennessee

The Hermitage is one of the largest and most popular presidental museums in the U.S. Nearly 15 million people from around the world have visited since opening in 1889. A nonprofit organization preserves and operates this 1,120-acre National Historic Landmark located in Nashville, Tennessee. Open daily 9-5 p.m.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.thehermitage.com/

Croft House and Grassmere Historic Farm

Croft House and Grassmere Historic Farm
Nashville, Tennessee

Located at the Nashville Zoo at Grassmere and listed on the National Register of Historic Homes, the Croft House, ca. 1810, is the centerpiece of the Grassmere Historic Farm and is open seasonally for guided tours. Interpreters will take you on a walking tour through the home, telling you the history of the property, stories from the five generations who lived there, and how the Nashville Zoo came to be located on the land. During the tour, you will see many original pieces of furniture, a portion of the extensive book collection, and several family portraits. After touring the home, you can explore the rest of the farm grounds, including the three-tier heirloom garden, the family cemetery, and the livestock barn which houses heritage breeds of cattle, sheep and horses.

The last residents of Grassmere, sisters Margaret and Elise Croft, deeded their family farm and the home built by their great-great grandfather to the Children's Museum of Nashville in 1964 to be left to the city as a nature center. Nashville Zoo began managing the site in 1997, building a first-class zoo that attracts three quarters of a million visitors annually. Admission to the Croft House is included with zoo admission. Visit www.nashvillezoo.org for more information.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.nashvillezoo.org/grassmere-historic-home

Texas

The French Legation Museum  The French Legation Museum

The French Legation Museum The French Legation Museum
Austin, Texas

The French Legation Museum is a non-profit historic home museum housed within Austin's oldest existing wood-framed structure. Built in 1841 when Austin was the capital for the Republic of Texas, the home was built by the French diplomat, Alphonse Dubois. The Museum offers guided tours Tuesdays through Sundays from 1-4pm.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.frenchlegationmuseum.org/index.php

Neill-Cochran House Museum

Neill-Cochran House Museum
Austin, Texas

The Neill-Cochran House is considered to be one of Austin’s three most important historic residences. Built in 1855 as a suburban estate, this impressive Greek Revival house has survived war, neglect, and the immense growth of the University of Texas area and the capital city.Built by Abner Cook, the builder responsible for the Texas Governor's Mansion and other notable 19th-century homes, the Neill-Cochran House Museum is now a museum preserving the history of early Austin. In addition, the Museum may be rented for weddings, grand galas, luncheons, and meetings.

The Neill-Cochran House Museum is open to the public for tours between 2:00 and 5:00 PM, Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is $5 per person, and free to children 15 years old and younger.

Special arrangements outside our regular hours may be made for group tours. Please schedule with museum staff at least one week in advance.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.nchmuseum.org

McFaddin-Ward House Museum

McFaddin-Ward House Museum
Beaumont, Texas

Beautiful Beaux Arts colonial mansion built in 1906 by Texas oil family. 12,800 square feet of space with sweeping porches, fine furnishings and valuable antiques. Spacious lawns and flower beds surround the three-floor home. Home’s original furnishings on display. Tours led by well-versed volunteer docents. Allow 90 minutes. $3/person. Call 409-832-2134 for tour reservation and avoid disappointment. Active Calendar of Events. Takes programs to schools and retirement homes and service clubs. Collection Highlights, museum books, and museum newsletters on website. Mounts national museum conference for historic house museums in 2010.

More info...

Web Site: www.mcfaddin-ward.org

Charles Stillman House Museum

Charles Stillman House Museum
Brownsville, Texas

The house was built in 1850 by Henry Miller, occupied by the Charles Stillman family, and later by Thomas Carson, longtime Brownsville mayor and Judge of the Cameron County Commissioners Court. In 1858 Miller sold the house to Manuel Trevino de los Santos Coy, a prominent Brownsville and H. Matamoros merchant who lived here as Mexican Consul. In 1875 Trevino, Porfirio Diaz and others secretly plotted to overthrow of Mexican president Sebastian Lerdo de Tejada, whom Diaz succeeded in 1876. The house remained with the Trevino family until purchased in 1958 by Chauncey D. Stillman, great grandson on Charles, who restored the structure and donated it to the city as a museum.

More info...

Web Site: www.brownsvillehistory.org

A. W. Perry Homestead Museum

A. W. Perry Homestead Museum
Carrollton, Texas

The A.W. Perry Homestead Museum offers a glimpse of life as it was in north central Texas at the turn of the 20th Century. A.W. and Sarah (Huffman) Perry were pioneer homesteaders of Peters Colony who came to Carrollton in the year 1844 from Carrollton, Illinois. They claimed 640 acres and built a house on this farm in 1857. In 1909, their son Dewitt Perry and his wife Francis (Grimes) tore down the first house and used some of the lumber to build the present day house. This structure is now the Museum, restored in 1976 for the bicentennial. You can still find the foundation stones of the first Perry farmhouse in the backyard of the Museum. Designated a historic landmark in 1977 by the Texas Historical Commission. Open Wednesday through Saturday from 10am-Noon and 1pm-5pm, Free Admission

More info...

Web Site: www.cityofcarrollton.com/museum

Thistle Hill

Thistle Hill
Fort Worth, Texas

1904 Georgian Revival Cattle Baron's Mansion with Arts and Crafts interiors. 1.5 acre landscaped grounds feature a Carriage House, Tea House and Pergola. The Wharton-Scott House was a private residence for only 34 years, thus interior details are all intact and professionally restored. Tour includes both Thistle Hill and the nearby 1899 Ball-Eddleman-McFarland House. Both owned and operated by Historic Fort Worth, Inc., a local partner with the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

More info...

Web Site: www.historicfortworth.org

The Heritage Society

The Heritage Society
Houstin, Texas

The Heritage Society Museum is located at 1100 Bagby, Sam Houston Park. Founded in 1954, The Heritage Society is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which strives to preserve the history of the community through preservation, restoration of historic structures, exhibition and educational programs. Through permanent and rotating museum exhibits, daily historic structure tours, special lectures, events and trips, children and adults are able to understand and experience life in early Houston.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.heritagesociety.org/

Heard-Craig House

Heard-Craig House
McKinney, Texas

The Heard-Craig House was built in 1900 by Stephen & Lillie Heard. The Heard's gracious hospitality made this home a center of social, business, art and literary activities. The residence still contains the family's furnishings, heirlooms, art collection and personal memorabilia. Tours are offered Tuesday, Thursday,Saturday and by appointment.

More info...

Web Site: www.heardcraig.org

The George W. Bush Childhood Home

The George W. Bush Childhood Home
Midland, Texas

The mission of the George W. Bush Childhood Home, Inc., is to express and interpret the history of one of America’s great families by telling the story of the Bush Family and the childhood of George W. Bush in Midland, Texas, and celebrating the lives of two presidents, two governors, and two first ladies.

More info...

Web Site: www.bushchildhoodhome.com

Heritage Farmstead Museum

Heritage Farmstead Museum
Plano, Texas

Heritage Farmstead Museum (HFM) is the premiere living history site interpreting the Texas Blackland Prairie region in North Texas. An American Alliance of Museums accredited institution, the HFM strives to offer a step into the past for people of many ages, interests and backgrounds. The museum is an institution of public service and is accountable to the public through government, self and peer imposed regulations.

More info...

Web Site: www.heritagefarmstead.org

Villa Finale

Villa Finale
San Antonio, Texas

Given to the National Historic Preservation Trust in 2004, this was once the home of Walter Mathis, a leading preservationist in San Antonio, Texas. Walter Mathis is widely recognized as the catalyst for the revitalization of the King William neighborhood, now a National Register Historic District. In addition to his preservation work, Walter Mathis was also a prodigious collector of artifacts of nearly every type; these collections fill Villa Finale. Throughout his home, one finds beautiful examples of European furniture, and fine and decorative arts. Mr. Mathis particularly enjoyed collecting memorabilia relating to the life and death of Napoleon Bonaparte. Mr. Mathis’s interest in Texas art is represented in the collection by such artists as Mary Bonner, and Julian and Robert Onderdonk. In addition, there is a wide range of Texas decorative arts, such as Bell silver, Texas furniture, and Texan campaign ceramics.

More info...

Web Site: www.villafinale.org

Edward Steves Homestead

Edward Steves Homestead
San Antonio, Texas

This elegant three-story house, located in the King William Historic District on the east bank of the San Antonio River, was built in 1876 for Edward Steves, founder of the Steves Lumber Company. The design of the house has been attributed to Alfred Giles, a prominent San Antonio architect. The interior has retained many period details, including decorative paint work on the walls, and some original family furnishings. The property remained in the Steves family until 1952, when Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Vaughan (a Steves descendant) donated it to the San Antonio Conservation Society. Today, the Steves Homestead is interpreted as the home of a prosperous German immigrant family of Victorian era San Antonio.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.saconservation.org/tours/steves.htm

Utah

Stagecoach Inn

Stagecoach Inn
Fairfield, Utah

The Stagecoach Inn, a two-story adobe and frame hotel built by John Carson, one of the first settlers of Fairfield, in 1858. It also served as John Carsons home. Stagecoach Inn was the first stop south of Salt Lake City on the Overland Stage Route and also a stop on the Historic Pony Express Route. Because of its proximity to old Camp Floyd, the clientele naturally included large numbers of armed personnel. It was one of the few respectable establishments in this frontier town. Seventeen saloons and other entertainment locations catered to the needs of a military population. The inn was restored from shambles in June 1959. It contains furnishings of the period, indicating the hospitality of the inn - not elegant, but comfortable.

More info...

Web Site: http://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/camp-floyd

Vermont

Robert Todd Lincoln's Hildene  Robert Todd Lincoln's Hildene

Robert Todd Lincoln's Hildene Robert Todd Lincoln's Hildene
Manchester, Vermont

In 1902, Robert Todd Lincoln, the eldest son of President Abraham & Mary Todd Lincoln, hired a Boston architectural firm to build a stately home on a promontory overlooking the Battenkill Valley in Manchester, Vermont. The site he chose commanded sweeping views of the valley bordered by the Taconic Mountains to the west and the Green Mountains to the east. His magnificent Georgian Revival style home was completed three years later. Robert Todd Lincoln named his new home Hildene meaning "hill" and "valley." Hildene would be Mr. Lincoln's summer home for the next 21 years and would be the only house in America where all of Abraham Lincoln's descendants would eventually reside.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.hildene.org/

Virginia

Monticello

Monticello
Charlottesville, Virginia

Monticello is the autobiographical masterpiece of Thomas Jefferson, designed and redesigned and built and rebuilt for more than forty years.

More info...

Web Site: www.monticello.org

Gari Melchers Home and Studio

Gari Melchers Home and Studio
Falmouth, Virginia

Gari Melchers Home and Studio at Belmont - The richly furnished country house and working studio of American impressionist painter Gari Melchers (1860-1932) can be seen as they appeared in the 1920s. Explore the colorful formal gardens and wooded hiking trails of the artist's 27-acre retreat. Enjoy special exhibitions of the art of Melchers and his contemporaries.

More info...

Web Site: www.GariMelchers.org/

Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest

Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest
Forest, Virginia

One of only two homes designed for his own use, Poplar Forest was an important part of Thomas Jefferson’s life: a private retreat situated far from public scrutiny and the demands on his time. Jefferson sojourned to Poplar Forest regularly in his retirement, between the ages of 66-80, to find rest and leisure, rekindle his creativity and spend time with his grandchildren. He designed the perfectly octagonal house at Poplar Forest during his second term as President of the United States.

Since 1983, the nonprofit Corporation for Jefferson's Poplar Forest has worked to rescue and restore Thomas Jefferson's plantation and retreat home for the educational and cultural benefit of the public.

Poplar Forest is now a National Historic Landmark undergoing award-winning restoration and archaeology. Offering daily tours and special events, Poplar Forest is open April through November, Wednesday through Monday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.poplarforest.org/

Oatlands Historic House and Gardens

Oatlands Historic House and Gardens
Leesburg, Virginia

A stately mansion, beautiful rolling farmland, exquisite gardens, a repository of more than 200 years of American history and culture – all of these can be found at Oatlands Historic House and Gardens near Leesburg, Virginia.

Established in the early 19th century by George Carter, Oatlands was a thriving wheat plantation and base for numerous business enterprises until the time of the Civil War. During most of the 20th century Oatlands served as the country estate of Mr. and Mrs. William Corcoran Eustis, affluent Washingtonians with strong ties to the American political arena.

Now a National Trust Historic Site and a National Historic Landmark, Oatlands is flourishing with four full seasons of activities. Come visit this beautiful part of Virginia with its important historic landscape, hear the stories Oatlands has to tell, discover the history of the place and its personalities, and enjoy the many programs and events at Oatlands.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.oatlands.org/index.asp

Morven Park

Morven Park
Leesburg, Virginia

A National Register Historic Property, Morven Park was for 40 years the home of Virginia Gov. Westmoreland Davis. More than 100,000 people visit Morven Park each year, enjoying entertaining and educational programming at its three museums and multifaceted equestrian center, and experiencing its beautiful scenery, historic gardens, sports fields, and hiking trails, all within its 1,000-plus acres.

The public is invited to events in every season, including Civil War reenactments, equestrian competitions, festivals, and hands-on learning programs.

Morven Park is a non-profit organization, 501(c)3, operated by the Westmoreland Davis Memorial Foundation. Its mission is to preserve and advance the ideals of Gov. Davis, offering programs that reflect civic-minded leadership, sustainable agriculture, and the conscientious use of open space for the public good.

More info...

Web Site: www.morvenpark.org

Stonewall Jackson House

Stonewall Jackson House
Lexington, Virginia

The Stonewall Jackson House in historic Lexington, Virginia, is the only house that famous Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson ever owned. The brick portion of the house was constructed in 1800 and the home was expanded in 1845 with the stone addition. Jackson and his second wife, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, lived in this home just before the Civil War. Tours of the home focus on the decade before the war, and interpret Jackson's life as a professor, church leader, businessman, community leader, and husband.

More info...

Web Site: www.stonewalljackson.org/

Belle Grove Historic Plantation

Belle Grove Historic Plantation
Middleton, Virginia

As a prized survivor of regional and national significance, Belle Grove is a National Historic Landmark, a Virginia Historic Landmark, and a historic property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The centerpiece of the new Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historic Park, Belle Grove serves the Shenandoah Valley and Virginia as an educational center through the many interpretive programs it offers. Its highest priorities are to stimulate historical and preservation awareness among regional residents and visitors from the United States and throughout the world.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.bellegrove.org/index.php?

Stratford Hall

Stratford Hall
Stratford, Virginia

Built by Thomas Lee in the 1730s, Stratford Hall is one of the great houses of American history. Four generations of the Lee family passed through its stately doors, including Richard Henry Lee and Francis Lightfoot Lee, the only two brothers to sign the Declaration of Independence, Revolutionary War hero "Light Horse Harry" Lee, and his son, Civil War General Robert E. Lee, who was born at Stratford in 1807.

More info...

Web Site: http://www.StratfordHall.org

Riddick's Folly House Museum  Riddick's Folly House Museum

Riddick's Folly House Museum Riddick's Folly House Museum
Suffolk, Virginia

The 21-room, 8,000 square-foot mansion of the Riddick family also served as headquarters for the Union Army during its occupation of Suffolk, Virginia during the Civil War. Built in 1837 in the Greek Revival style, the house now features restored double parlors, sitting rooms, bedrooms, and a laundry facility, all with period furniture and art.

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Web Site: http://www.riddicksfolly.org/

Washington

Bigelow House Museum

Bigelow House Museum
Olympia, Washington

The Bigelow House Museum is dedicated to preserving and interpreting the early history of Olympia and Washington Territory. It is the oldest residence in Olympia, Washington and one of the earliest still standing in the Pacific Northwest.

Pioneer lawyer and Territorial Legislator Daniel R. Bigelow and his schoolteacher wife Ann Elizabeth White Bigelow built Bigelow House in the 1850s. They were pivotal figures in early Washington history and the struggle for women’s rights and public education.

The house is a charming example of the Carpenter Gothic style popular in rural America during the mid-1800s and is still surrounded by more than an acre of the family’s original land claim. The home displays original documents, artifacts, and furnishings representing 150 years of local, state and regional history.

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Web Site: www.bigelowhouse.org/

Bigelow House Museum

Bigelow House Museum
Olympia, Washington

Oldest house in Olympia Washington, built by pioneer lawyer and legislator Daniel R Bigelow. Open summer weekends and year round by appointment.

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Web Site: http://bigelowhouse.org

West Virginia

The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Museum

The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace Museum
Hillsboro, West Virginia

Built in 1852, this attractive three-story house in the country town of Hillsboro, West Virginia was hand-constructed by a Dutch refugee family escaping religious persecution in Holland. The famous author Pearl S. Buck was born in the home in 1892 while her parents were on leave from missionary work in China. Today, you can take a guided tour to learn about Pearl Buck and her family or stroll through the surrounding fields. The carpentry shop and barn contain over 100 historic farm and woodworking tools, and the log home of Pearl’s father’s family, the Sydenstrickers, has been moved from Greenbrier County to the property in Hillsboro for a second museum and cultural center.

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Web Site: www.pearlsbuckbirthplace.com/

Wisconsin

Hearthstone Historic House Museum

Hearthstone Historic House Museum
Appleton, Wisconsin

First house in the world lit with an Edison central hydroelectric station September 30, 1882.

Hearthstone was lit on September 30, 1882 along with the Appleton Paper and Pulp Company and the Kimberly-Clark Vulcan Paper Mill. Only Hearthstone survives. This was the first time in the world that several buildings were lighted with a central hydroelectric station using the Edison system. Only one other central station in the nation existed - Thomas Edison's Pearl Street Station.

Hearthstone's rare 1882 Edison light switches and electroliers still are in operation. It is possible that Hearthstone is the sole surviving example of wiring and fixtures in their original location from the dawn of the electrical age.

The home features beautiful hand crafted wood working, hand-laid floors, and beautiful original stain glass.

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Web Site: http://www.focol.org/hearthstone/index.html

HISTORIC 1856 OCTAGON HOUSE

HISTORIC 1856 OCTAGON HOUSE
FOND DU LAC, Wisconsin

This Landmark Home, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is also one of Wisconsin's most haunted sites. Bring your friends for a fascinating visit, and perhaps you too will experience something... unexpected.

Originally built as an Indian Fort and Trading Post, the Octagon House of Fond du Lac was later used as a safe house for runaway slaves during the Civil War. Architecturally unique, this oddity has 12 rooms, and nine passageways! Docents report strange happenings almost every week!

Open for summer tours and seasonal events, the Octagon House also hosts dinner tours by candlelight. New this year are our Full Moon Paranormal Dinners, a chance for like minded individuals to gather over candlelight, enjoy a great meal on the house china, dress up in civil war attire (additional fee) and step back into history for a while!

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Web Site: www.OctagonHouseFdl.com

Charles Allis Art Museum

Charles Allis Art Museum
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The Charles Allis Art Museum is one of the few such ensembles preserved intact in its original form and some items in the collection are the only known examples of their kind in existence. To complement this collection, the Charles Allis Art Museum holds several changing exhibitions each year which feature the work by Wisconsin artists.

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Web Site: www.cavtmuseums.org

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This Italian Renaissance-style villa, designed and built by architect David Adler in 1923, was originally the residence of Lloyd Smith of the A.O. Smith Corporation and his family. The Villa Terrace features fine and decorative arts dating from the 15th to the 18th centuries, wrought-iron masterpieces by Cyril Colnik and a formal Garden.

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Web Site: www.cavtmuseums.org

The Pabst Mansion  The Pabst Mansion

The Pabst Mansion The Pabst Mansion
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The founder of Pabst Blue Ribbon, Captain Frederick Pabst, finished his Flemish Renaissance Revival Mansion in 1892. Today it's a lovely museum.

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Web Site: http://www.pabstmansion.com/

Paine Art Center and Gardens

Paine Art Center and Gardens
Oshkosh, Wisconsin

The Paine is a historic estate that serves as a multi-faceted museum for learning and inspiration.

The museum preserves the mansion, surrounding architectural structures, and many of the interiors as they were created by founders Nathan and Jessie Kimberly Paine.

Selections from the museum’s art collection, much of which was acquired by Nathan and Jessie, are featured in the many rooms and settings of the estate.

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Web Site: www.thepaine.org/

Historic Indian Agency House

Historic Indian Agency House
Portage, Wisconsin

The Historic Indian Agency House (HIAH) is owned and operated by The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Wisconsin. The house was built in 1832 by the United States Government as a residence for John Kinzie, the Indian Agent to the Ho-Chunk people, and still sits on its original foundation on a 226-acre expanse of nearly untouched land. The site holds the stories of the fur trade, the opening of the West, and the accompanying demise of the Native way of life. The site is also an ecological gem that preserves remnants of the Ice Age and other natural processes that shaped Wisconsin. The mission of the site is to “preserve, interpret, and promote this 19th-century historic site in order to educate the public about the history of the Wisconsin territory, including the Winnebago Indians during the Commission of the United States Indian Agent John Harris Kinzie.” The House was opened to the public in 1932, and since then has maintained a regular May 15 to October 15 open season. Guided tours of the Agency House are offered for a nominal fee, with the permanent introductory exhibit and annual rotating exhibit available free of charge in the Visitors’ Center.

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Web Site: www.agencyhouse.org

Villa Louis

Villa Louis
Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin

Experience Victorian life during the 19th century as you visit the estate of one of Wisconsin's most prosperous families

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Web Site: villalouis.wisconsinhistory.org

International Listings

Canada

Beaulieu Historic Site - The Lougheed House

Beaulieu Historic Site - The Lougheed House
Calgary, Canada

Beaulieu is the 1891 Lougheed House, a designated National Historic Site in the heart of Calgary, Canada. The 2.8-acre estate, a public park known as Beaulieu Gardens, is open daily from 7:00 a.m. until sundown. The grand sandstone mansion is under restoration and is expected to reopen as a public heritage centre early in 2005.

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Web Site: http://www.lougheedhouse.com/

Scotland

Black Clauchrie House

Black Clauchrie House
Barrhill, Scotland

Black Clauchire Estate was commissioned by Robert David Jardine Mein-Austin from 1898 to 1904, as a family retreat for leisure and country pursuits. In the early years, Black Clauchrie Estate was self sustainable with over 20 full time staff, all provided with accommodation in the beautiful, cottage homes with red sandstone detailing. In 2004, Adrian and Caroline Goodall moved to Black Clauchrie to capture, preserve and restore it to its former glory. They now welcome guests to share in this tranquil retreat, where you can step back in time to a bygone era.

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Web Site: http://www.largeholidayhomes-blackclauchrie.com/