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Listing No. 29383

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For Sale By Owner

$110,000

1885 Victorian

Maitland, Missouri

D. A. Gelvin home- 1885 Victorian

front of house
front of house
house in winter
house in winter
back of house
back of house
back of house
back of house
side of house
side of house
a window in the center on the bottom of side of house was boarded over at some point but it is believed the original glass window is intact underneath the siding
side of house
side of house
side of house after removal of enclosure at back kitchen door. a window in the center bottom on side of house was boarded over at some point, but it is believed the original window is still intact under the boards
carriage house
carriage house
side yard
side yard
putting new roof on carriage house
putting new roof on carriage house
the original roof of the carriage house before it was replaced
reroofing carriage house
reroofing carriage house
original roof of carriage house before being replaced, notice the vent on top of roof, it is currently inside the carriage house awaiting repair and replacement
carriage house soffits
carriage house soffits
new roof, tongue and groove soffits made in the original style
carriage house new roof
carriage house new roof
new roof installed on carriage house in 2019, asphalt shingles in cedar shake style, original bell curve design of rafters replicated. awaiting replacement of original roof vent
carriage house new roof
carriage house new roof
cast iron wood stove in carriage house
cast iron wood stove in carriage house
original cast iron wood burning stove, new stovepipe installed when roof replaced
vent for carriage house roof
vent for carriage house roof
original vent for carriage house roof, just needs minor repair to rivets and removal of dents from tree branches, repainting
front entry
front entry
front entry staircase
front entry staircase
newel post
newel post
front sitting room/fireplace
front sitting room/fireplace
coal burning fireplace
fireplace dragon
fireplace dragon
closeup of carvings on fireplace
coal burning fireplace
coal burning fireplace
stained glass transom
stained glass transom
All of the downstairs windows and doors have stained glass above them. This door is believed to have been the entrance into D.A. Gelvin's office/reception area. The glass on the door is etched with his name.
etched glass door
etched glass door
Look closely at the glass, you can see the etched "D. A. Gelvin" in reverse. It is etched on the outside of the glass so people entering into the house can see it. This is believed to be the door he used to enter into his office or reception area.
upstairs landing
upstairs landing
front tower
front staircase
front staircase
looking down staircase from above
upstairs bedroom and bath doors
upstairs bedroom and bath doors
master bedroom door on right, original bathroom to left
upstairs landing with view into master bedroom
upstairs landing with view into master bedroom
front bedroom
front bedroom
back bedroom
back bedroom
tower bedroom
tower bedroom
tower bedroom
tower bedroom
notice an original light fixture on the wall by window. This is the only room that shows a little water damage in the ceiling, from a leak through the roof in the tower above. Damage is minor
original light fixture in a bedroom
original light fixture in a bedroom
an original fixture in a bedroom
an original fixture in a bedroom
original light switch in bedroom
original light switch in bedroom
attic/ updated fusebox in attic
attic/ updated fusebox in attic
attic & chimney
attic & chimney
entrance into root/storm cellar
entrance into root/storm cellar
brick wall on right side of stairs was repaired and re-mortared in 2019 with new steel door placed over entrance
inside root/storm cellar
inside root/storm cellar
back wall was repaired and re-mortared in 2019, cellar was in very good shape otherwise
history of house
history of house
history of house
history of house
history of D. A. Gelvin
history of D. A. Gelvin
This is some history of D. A. Gelvin, who built the house in 1885. He made his wealth in cattle shipping and bluegrass production. He designed the first strippers to harvest bluegrass seed. At the time, he had the largest bluegrass field of its kind in the world.
Bedrooms 5
Full Baths 1
Half Baths 1
Stories 2.5
Acres 0.8
Lot Size 250 x 140
Property Taxes
$752
Assessed Tax Value
$9,960

Features.

  • Attic
  • Basement
  • Foyer
  • Walk out Basement
  • Walk-Up Attic
  • Master bedroom upstairs
  • 1 Outbuilding
  • Porch
  • Storage Building
  • Detached Workshop
  • 2nd Staircase
  • Built-in Cabinets
  • 1 Fireplace
  • Grand staircase
  • High Ceilings
  • Original wood windows
  • Asphalt shingle Roof
  • Shingle Roof: Asphalt shingle
  • City sewer
  • City water supply
  • Butler's Pantry
  • Carriage House
  • High Ceilings
  • Claw-foot Tub(s)
  • Plaster Walls
  • Pocket Doors
  • Ripple Glass
  • Servant's Staircase
  • Stained Glass Windows
  • Transoms
  • Turret
  • Wrap-Around Porch

Like This Listing?

Contact the Seller directly.

Kathryn Negaard

Phone: 228-424-6584

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

History

This home was built in 1885 by E. M. King, contractor, for Mr David Allen Gelvin. Mr Gelvin was born in Pennsylvania in 1850. At the age of 20, he moved to Maitland, Missouri, where he started to farm and to buy and feed cattle. He was successful through hard work and good business judgment. The Sunday edition, July 9, 1899, of the Saint Louis Globe Democrat stated that Mr. Gelvin was characterized as "one of the greatest buyers and shippers of stock cattle in America." He was as well known for his Blue Grass production as for his cattle business. He designed the first strippers to harvest Blue Grass, and his 1,000 acre pasture was thought to be the largest in the world. Many fine golf courses throughout the country were seeded from his pasture. D.A. Gelvin died in 1936. At his death, he had been shipping cattle to the Union Stockyards in Chicago longer than any other individual.

Around 1940, the home was sold to be used as a funeral home; L. B. Campbell and Son Funeral Home. In 1967, the home was sold again to Atchison, Pettijohn & Crawford and became known as Atchison Funeral House. Later it became the Johnson Funeral Home. Mr Vern Stout was the funeral home caretaker from 1940 until his death in 1981.

Somewhere around 2000, the funeral home closed and the home was sold to an individual.

Because the house was not lived in after 1940, very little was done to update the home. Mr Vern Stout lived there as the caretaker to keep up the grounds and lower level of the house. The home still has all the original windows and woodwork. Some original light fixtures remain. Original window screens, doors and some woodwork that had been removed were found in the attic, basement, and carriage house. It appears that nothing was ever thrown away.

Recent Improvements

The carriage house roof was rotting and falling in. It was replaced in 2019. It was replaced as close to the original design as possible. The original rafters had a "bell shaped curve" to them, and the new rafters were cut using the original rafters as a template. New shingles are a cedar shake design. The original soffits were tongue and groove board, and the new soffits were designed just like the original. The original vent for the top of the carriage house was taken down during the roofing process. It is inside the carriage house, waiting to be placed back on the roof after it has some minor repairs and painting done.

The house had forced heat and air installed at some point, though only in the lower level. The working condition is unknown. The upstairs bedrooms appear to have had gas heat at one time, and more recently had electric baseboard heaters installed. It is unknown if they work. There is a fuse panel in the basement and a newer fuse panel in the attic. The wiring from the attic panel is newer, but appears to be unfinished. The electricity was working in the house, but was disconnected from the main line in August of 2019 to allow trees to be cut away from the house. It has not yet been reconnected to the main pole. There is still original tube and knob wiring throughout the attic and carriage house, though it is disconnected.

There is a makeshift half bath in the downstairs, and a full bath off the master bedroom upstairs. The upstairs bathroom appears to be original to the house. The original cast iron clawfoot bathtub was found buried next to the carriage house. It was dug up and placed in the carriage house to be restored, but appears to be in excellent condition. The upstairs bathroom was in a half finished state of remodeling.

At one time, the original back door entrance to the kitchen was enclosed. The enclosure was falling apart and was removed in Aug 2019, exposing the original back door entrance. An interior door had been placed when the enclosure was built, but the original decorative back door with a window was found in the basement and brought up to be placed back in its original position.

In 2019 the root cellar/storm cellar had brick repair/mortar and tuck pointing to repair the back wall, vent, and wall along the stair case. A new steel door was installed over the root cellar.

The roof of the house and the porches are in immediate need of repair.

Comments & Feedback

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Listing No. 29383

Prev Next # 5 of 50

of the list
Added Since 10/10/19

Back to List

New Search

Like This Listing?

Contact the Seller directly.

Kathryn Negaard

Phone: 228-424-6584

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

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