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Listing No. 29021

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For Sale

$ 725,000

1905 Transitional Shingle Style Craftsman

612 North 4th Street
Stadium District
Tacoma, Washington

The 1905 John Snyder House

1905 John Snyder House
1905 John Snyder House
The Snyder House is an impressive five bedroom Craftsman designed by famed architect Ambrose Russell for lumber baron John Snyder and his wife Ella in 1905. The home exemplifies the transition between earlier shingle style Victorian architecture and the "newer" Craftsman style, and epitomizes the wealth and grandeur of turn of the century Tacoma. The Snyder House retains its original architectural details and is included on the Tacoma Register of Historic Places.
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thesnyderhouse.net

Designed by famed architect Ambrose Russell
Designed by famed architect Ambrose Russell
The Snyder house circa 1906
The Snyder house circa 1906
John and Ella Snyder Circa 1920
John and Ella Snyder Circa 1920
Tacoma Circa 1885 Snyder lumber mill in lower left corner
Tacoma Circa 1885 Snyder lumber mill in lower left corner
Front porch with original stone columns
Front porch with original stone columns
Entry hall with original stained glass door
Entry hall with original stained glass door
Formal living room
Formal living room
Side entry hall
Side entry hall
Main floor half bath with wooden tanked toilet
Main floor half bath with wooden tanked toilet
Formal dining room
Formal dining room
Eat-in kitchen
Eat-in kitchen
Second floor landing
Second floor landing
Large rear bedroom
Large rear bedroom
Front bedroom with bay window
Front bedroom with bay window
Additional front bedroom
Additional front bedroom
Butler's pantry with original cabinets
Butler's pantry with original cabinets
Rear bedroom with balcony
Rear bedroom with balcony
Servants staircase
Servants staircase
3rd floor bedroom
3rd floor bedroom
3rd floor bath
3rd floor bath
Unfinished basement
Unfinished basement
Fenced rear yard
Fenced rear yard
Two car garage
Two car garage
Bedrooms 5
Full Baths 2
Half Baths 1
Heated Sq. Ft. 4,290
Unheated Sq. Ft. 1,391
Stories 3

Features.

  • 1st Floor Bath
  • Attic
  • Basement
  • Bonus Room
  • Dining room
  • Dry Basement
  • Entry Hall
  • Foyer
  • Library
  • Living room
  • Unfinished Basement
  • Walk out Basement
  • 2 Car Garage
  • Fenced Yard
  • Porch
  • Storm Windows
  • 2nd Staircase
  • Built-in Bookcases
  • Built-in Cabinets
  • Carpet
  • Ceramic Tile
  • 1 Fireplace
  • Gas Logs
  • Grand staircase
  • High Ceilings
  • Laundry Chute
  • Natural gas fireplace
  • Original wood windows
  • Asphalt shingle Roof
  • Walk-In Closets
  • Wood floors
  • City sewer
  • City water supply
  • Dishwasher
  • Disposal
  • Gas heating
  • Range
  • Refrigerator
  • Security System
  • Water Heater - Gas
  • Butler's Pantry
  • Claw-foot Tub(s)
  • Plaster Walls
  • Pocket Doors
  • Servant's Staircase
  • Stained Glass Windows
  • Steam Radiators

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Agent Contact Information

Windermere

Jeff Williams

Phone: 253-303-1135

www.southsoundpropertygroup.com

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History

This historic home was built for prominent Tacoma residents John and Ella Snyder in 1905. John Snyder was born in Chillicothe, Ohio in 1852. His father died when he was a young boy, and he went to work as a hat salesman at the age of 14 to support his family. Snyder and his future business partner John Stevens left Detroit after the Panic of 1884 and moved to Tacoma, where they hoped to reinvent themselves as lumbermen. In 1885, Stevens managed to borrow enough money to build a sawmill, thought to be the first at the head of Commencement Bay. Once the business was established, Snyder returned to Ohio to marry Ella Frost and bring her back to Tacoma. Snyder’s first mill was destroyed by a fire in 1890, but he was elected to the Tacoma City Council soon after in 1892. Snyder was an active member of the council, travelling to Philadelphia to help negotiate the city's purchase of the Tacoma Light and Water Company from C.B. Wright. In 1903, Snyder built a second sawmill on the Puyallup River, a business venture that secured the family’s financial success. Snyder's second mill, Tacoma Door, was the first in Tacoma to successfully manufacture doors from fir. With their newfound success, the Snyders were able to hire the architectural firm of Russell and Babcock in 1904 to design their house on N. 4th. The home was completed in 1905 at a cost of $5,003. Architect Ambrose Russell is best known for his work on the Tacoma Armory, the Masonic Temple, the Perkins building, Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Tacoma's Rust mansion and the Governor's Mansion in Olympia. The Snyder House reflects a transition from the shingle to Craftsman style of architecture, as interpreted by Ambrose Russell. It retains the height of many of Russell’s earlier designs while incorporating "newer" horizontal Craftsman elements into a largely shingle style format. Given its storied history and intact architectural details, the Snyder House was added to the Tacoma Register of Historic Places in 2012.

Residence

This impressive shingle style Craftsman is located in the heart of Tacoma's historic Stadium District. Features include an inviting covered front porch with stone columns, the original front door, leaded and stained glass windows, original fir wainscoting and trim, quarter sawn oak floors and vintage wallpaper. The front entry hall is flanked by a library on the right and a formal living room on the left with a beautiful fireplace with original Arts and Crafts tile surround. A large formal dining room is located beyond the entry with French doors to the rear yard. A side entry hall offers access to a half bath with original corner wall sink and oak-tanked toilet. The entry level also includes an eat-in kitchen and butler's pantry. Four bedrooms are located on the second floor along with a large bathroom featuring tile floors and an original claw foot tub. A fifth bedroom, a family room and a full bathroom with jetted soaking tub and separate shower are located on the third floor, which originally served as the servant quarters accessed by a servant staircase at the back of the house. The original speaking tube connecting the servant quarters to the main part of the house is still intact. The large unfinished basement has a door to the back yard and offers an opportunity for future expansion. The property also includes a fenced yard with a deck and a two car garage off the alley.

Neighborhood

Tacoma’s historic Stadium District is anchored by Stadium High School, an iconic Hewitt and Hewitt designed French Renaissance structure that was originally slated to be a hotel. Construction of the hotel began in 1891 but was halted by an economic downturn before completion in 1893. When a fire burned much of the existing structure in 1898, the city of Tacoma decided to re-purpose the building. Stadium High School opened in 1906. The district that bears its name is located in close proximity to downtown Tacoma, Wright Park, the medical center and the waterfront. As one of Tacoma’s oldest “suburbs”, the Stadium District features some of the city’s grandest residential architecture. The neighborhood is also home to the Annie Wright School, the Tacoma Lawn and Tennis Club and a wide variety of shops and restaurants including Shake, Shake, Shake, Indo and Art House Cafe. Annual neighborhood events include the Dickens Festival and the Art & Wine Walk.

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Listing No. 29021

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Agent Contact Information

Windermere

Jeff Williams

Phone: 253-303-1135

www.southsoundpropertygroup.com

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

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