OldHouses.com logo

Listing No. 27871

Prev Next # 36 of 50

of the list
Priced at or above 600,000

Back to List

New Search

For Sale

$ 699,000

1854 Greek Revival

229 West Bank Street
Salisbury, North Carolina

Completely Restored Andrew Murphy House Located in the West Square Historical District of Salisbury!

Beautiful Historic Greek Revival was built on the highest point in the Town of Salisbury in 1854. 5 Bedrooms, 3.5 Bath w/ over 5,000 Square Feet in Downtown Historic Salisbury, NC!
Scroll down for more information

View the Virtual Tour

Bedrooms 5
Full Baths 3
Half Baths 1
Heated Sq. Ft. 5,188
Unheated Sq. Ft. 1,338
Stories 2
Acres 0.5
Lot Size
110x187x111x188
Property Taxes
6,053.28
Assessed Tax Value
441,170
MLS No. 3396140

Features.

  • 1st Floor Bath
  • 1st Floor Bedroom
  • 1st Floor Laundry Room
  • Basement
  • Bonus Room
  • Breakfast Room
  • Crawl Space
  • Den
  • Dining room
  • Entry Hall
  • Foyer
  • Gourmet Kitchen
  • Laundry Room
  • Living room
  • Reader's Loft
  • Sunroom
  • Utility Room
  • Walk out Basement
  • Driveway - Dirt
  • Fresh paint
  • 1 Outbuilding
  • Patio
  • Porch
  • Restored exterior
  • Storage Building
  • Built-in Bookcases
  • Built-in Cabinets
  • Ceiling Fans
  • Ceramic Tile
  • 6 Fireplaces
  • Gas Logs
  • Grand staircase
  • High Ceilings
  • Metal Roof
  • Wood floors
  • Shingle Roof: Metal
  • Central air
  • City sewer
  • City water supply
  • Dishwasher
  • Disposal
  • Gas heating
  • Range
  • Refrigerator
  • Security System
  • Water Heater - Gas
  • 12-foot Ceilings
  • Claw-foot Tub(s)
  • Transoms
  • Wrap Around Porch
  • 12 Ionic Columns
  • Deep Crown Moldings
  • Heart of Pine Wood Floors
  • Original Ceilings Upper
  • Original Ceilings Upper
  • Original Custom Mantels
  • Original Millwork
  • Walk in Pantry

Like This Listing?

Agent Contact Information

Contact me Today to Schedule Your Personal Tour of this Beautiful Historic Home!

London Scialdone

Phone: 704-636-7373
Mobile: 704-280-3516

More Listing Information

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

Equal Housing Opportunity logo

Local and Regional Links.

Historic Preservation - West Square Historical District of Salisbury

Salisbury, NC Historic Preservation Site

More About This House

Beautiful Historic Greek Revival was built on the highest point in the Town of Salisbury in 1854. The house survived the Civil War (the handwritten diaries of those who witnessed Sherman's Raid still remain in the home). This majestic West Bank Street residence has been host to Thomas Edison, Woodrow Wilson & many more dignitaries. Completely restored home offers beautiful custom kitchen with quartz counters & walk-in pantry. The architectural features of this home include 12 Ionic columns supporting two porches, original millwork, deep crown moldings, mantels & over-mantels. There's 12 foot ceilings downstairs & 10 foot ceilings upstairs, built-in cabinets, transom & heart of pine wood floors. All 6 fireplaces are exceptionally oversized & are surrounded by the original custom mantels. This home is located in the beautiful West Square Historic District & is walking distance to downtown Salisbury where there are 75 shops, 15 restaurants, a variety of churches & the public library.

Builder Info for the Andrew Murphy House

Michael Davis (ca. 1805-1881), was a house carpenter in antebellum Salisbury, North Carolina, who learned his trade from Salisbury master carpenter Samuel Lemly. According to his obituary in the Salisbury Carolina Watchman of November 10, 1881, Michael Davis was a native of Stanly County who came to Salisbury as a youth and learned the gunsmith's trade from George Vogler. The young Davis then "concluded to learn also the carpenter's trade, and engaged himself for this purpose to the late Col. Sam'l Lemly who at that time was a master builder in this place."
Michael Davis appeared in the U.S. census of 1850 as a carpenter aged 45 who owned $500 worth of real estate and headed a household that included his wife, Sarah, and their seven children aged 21 to one year old. The oldest of these was Jacob A. Davis, a carpenter, who probably worked in his father's shop. Also in the household was another carpenter, Samuel Linn, aged 23, and a 14-year-old boy, William J. Barringer, possibly an apprentice. In 1860, the census taker found Michael and Sarah Davis with a smaller household that included their younger children, plus two carpenters, Rufus Miller, 24, and George Cauble (Caudle?), 21. By this time, Davis owned $2,000 worth of real estate and personal property worth $150. The Davis family lived in a section of Salisbury where many of their neighbors were other artisans and their families. Active in local affairs, Michael Davis served on Salisbury's town board in the years 1852, 1853, 1856, and 1862. In later life he resided with his youngest son, Rowan (J. R.) Davis in Iredell County, and he died at his son's home at age 76.
Although he was busy in his profession for many years, only one building project has been definitely credited to Davis. A surviving contract between Davis and his client, Andrew Murphy of Salisbury, describes in detail the house Davis was to build for Murphy—a house that still stands in Salisbury. The agreement noted that Murphy was to pay Davis $2,871 for building a house, a kitchen, a smokehouse, and a dairy, between December 1852 and July 1853—a schedule that suggests that Davis had a large work force and could execute the project quickly. The Andrew Murphy House was to be substantial, two-story frame building with seven rooms, a hip roof, a shed across the rear, and a piazza, to be finished in the "latest" and "most fashionable" manner, including a bracket cornice indicative of the Italianate style.
The specifications noted certain features that were to be executed in a manner comparable to the house of Robert Murphy, which suggests that Davis might have built the Robert Murphy House in Salisbury as well. Among these were underpinning "of the best granite rock such as the underpinning of Robert Murphy's house," and the eaves "to project over at least two feet or more and to have brackets and be finished off something like Robert Murphy's house." Other elements were to be done "any way Murphy may require it" or "in the most fashionable and substantial manner." Such references to an existing building as a model were not uncommon, both in defining overall quality and in referring to a specific feature of design or method of execution. Michael Davis surely built other structures in Salisbury during his tenure there, but these have not yet been identified.

Historic Preservation – West Square Historical District of Salisbury, NC

Established in 1753, Salisbury today enjoys a rich heritage of historical and cultural resources that have been passed down over many centuries, and it honors a long tradition of recognizing, preserving, and promoting its many outstanding historic places. From the colorful bungalows of West Square, where the voices of brawny railroad workers still echo, to the classical Carnegie Library of Livingstone, where the books have whispered to young people through the ages, our shared inheritance is one that both enchants and inspires us.
Rich Heritage
Salisbury is known for its rich heritage of Piedmont architecture dating from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when the city reached its zenith as a regional economic powerhouse. Domestic and commercial buildings ranging in style from Victorian, Italianate, Beaux-Arts, Craftsman, Tudor, and beyond contribute to a strikingly eclectic and distinctive character in the downtown and adjoining neighborhoods.
Progressive Preservation
The city has taken a progressive approach to preserving historic resources, establishing itself at the forefront of preservation in North Carolina with the designation of its first historic district in 1975. Soon after, the City Council adopted a local historic overlay and established the Salisbury Historic Preservation Commission to oversee design review. In 1980, Salisbury was among the first five communities in North Carolina to begin participating in the National Trust Main Street Program. Finally, in 1994, Salisbury was designated a Certified Local Government with the State of North Carolina Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and has continued to partner with SHPO for technical assistance over the subsequent decades.
Historic Districts
Today, the city’s historic inventory includes ten districts as well as seventeen individual buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Five of these districts, including the downtown, are also locally-designated with design review for alterations or major changes. This stewardship of the downtown and historic neighborhoods, in conjunction with federal and state tax incentives with substantial private investment, has resulted in an award-winning downtown and urban core that is vibrant and authentic.
Historic Landmarks
Landmark designations may apply to individual buildings, structures, sites, areas, or objects which are studied by the commission and judged to have historical, architectural, archaeological, or cultural value.

Comments & Feedback

All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. OldHouses.com is not responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless.

Listing No. 27871

Prev Next # 36 of 50

of the list
Priced at or above 600,000

Back to List

New Search

Like This Listing?

Agent Contact Information

Contact me Today to Schedule Your Personal Tour of this Beautiful Historic Home!

London Scialdone

Phone: 704-636-7373
Mobile: 704-280-3516

More Listing Information

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

Equal Housing Opportunity logo

Your Feedback

Help & Support.

Return to Top
Pinterest
[X]