OldHouses.com logo

Listing No. 26810

Prev Next # 36 of 50

of the list
Priced at or above 200,000

Back to List

New Search

For Sale

$ 2,950,000

c. 1835 Greek Revival

The Joshua Hill House

Bedrooms 4
Full Baths 3
Half Baths 1
Heated Sq. Ft. 6,393
Stories 2.0
Acres 2.0
Lot Size 352x253
MLS No. 8198899

Features.

  • 1st Floor Bath
  • 1st Floor Bedroom
  • 1st Floor Laundry Room
  • Crawl Space
  • Den
  • Dining room
  • Entry Hall
  • Foyer
  • Gourmet Kitchen
  • Laundry Room
  • Library
  • Living room
  • Reader's Loft
  • Study
  • Sunroom
  • Master bedroom downstairs
  • 2 Car Garage
  • Driveway - Paved
  • Fenced Yard
  • Garden
  • Guest House
  • Patio
  • Pool - In Ground
  • Porch
  • Restored exterior
  • Sprinkler System
  • Storage Building
  • Built-in Bookcases
  • Built-in Cabinets
  • Ceiling Fans
  • 8 Fireplaces: Gas logs
  • Gas Logs
  • High Ceilings
  • Walk-In Closets
  • Wood floors
  • Shingle Roof: Metal
  • Central air
  • City sewer
  • City water supply
  • Dishwasher
  • Disposal
  • Refrigerator
  • Security System
  • Butler's Pantry
  • 9-foot Ceilings
  • Claw-foot Tub(s)
  • Stained Glass Windows
  • Circa 1835
  • On Historic Old Post Road
  • Pecan Grove
  • Pristine Garden

Like This Listing?

Agent Contact Information

Evelyn Van Oostrom

Phone: 770-616-4460

www.alginrealty.com

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

More About This House

The most historically significant home in Madison, GA: the Joshua Hill House perfectly depicts the slow, luxurious lifestyle of small-town Southern living. This 4 BR 3.5 BA Greek revival sits eloquently on its own block surrounded by gardens, a potting shed, 2 car detached garage, and a beautiful mature pecan grove. The interior features simply breathtaking original hardwood floors, immaculate moulding and details, and an amazing floor plan with a perfect balance of formality and comfortable living. Step out to the huge covered porch overlooking the sparkling pool and 1 BR 1 BA poolhouse with sprawling gardens. This home is absolutely incomparable in value and significance in Madison's historic district, just an hour from Atlanta and 30 minutes to Athens.

Schools in the Surrounding Area

The Morgan County School District is highly ranked in Georgia and is located close by to this home. A selection of private schools is in the area.

History of the Home

This important historic house is named for Joshua Hill, a lawyer and planter who lived here from 1849 until his death in 1891. Hill was a Union-sympathizing Congressman before the Civil War and a Republican-sympathizing U. S. Senator afterwards. During the war he served as Madison’s mayor. Hill was admired locally even though he was an ardent defender of the Union. His tombstone reads: “A Staunch Southern Friend of the Union.” His efforts are said to have helped Madison avoid additional destruction when Union troops marched through town in November 1864. Local folklore holds that Hill met Sherman’s approaching army at the edge of town and pleaded with them to spare Madison, based on his opposition to the war and his service in congress with Sherman’s brother. Sherman’s troops relented and spared the town’s antebellum homes, but they destroyed everything else – commercial buildings, railroad depot, post office, and cotton stores. Hill’s reputed action made him “the man who saved Madison” and made his house the most significantly historic home in town.

Emily Reid Hill was the lady of the house. She married at 16 and had, according to the1860 Census, 4 daughters and 4 sons. She was in charge of running the household. The Hill’s owned 59 slaves in 1860. In this house there were several slaves mentioned by name: Ellen was the seamstress for Mrs. Hill, Lizzie and Dinah did the laundry, Liza was a second seamstress who helped Ellen and Caroline was the children’s nurse. The only male slave mentioned by name, working in the house was George, who was the husband of Ellen. He was a man servant who waited on Senator Hill and his son Josh. Others included as house staff were the cooks who worked outside in another building and they were not mentioned by name. Also living on site were the children of the women who worked in the house and their husbands who did outside work around the property – house upkeep, animals, garden and errands. The Hills’ also owned a plantation at Hard Labor Creek where the majority of the slaves lived and worked. That plantation and all of the buildings, including the slave houses, were burned to the ground by Union soldiers during the “March to the Sea,” November 1864. Emily never liked the idea of having slaves and she freed them all the day Slocum’s men marched through Madison. Emily died in 1888, age 68.


John Colbert built the original two-over-two structure at the core of the present house in the 1830s. Lawyer-planter Joshua Hill and his wife Emily moved to Madison from Monticello in 1849, and he lived in this house until his death in 1891. The Hill place, then as now, encompassed the entire block and included various barns and sheds.


The house started in the 1830s as a two-over-two Plantation Plain and remained in that classic style until it was enlarged in the 1880s to a four-over-four design fronted by a porch with square Federal columns. Following Hill’s death the home came into the possession of the related Turnell and Baldwin families, and remained in their hands until acquired by the current owners in 2007. In 1917 William Whitfield Baldwin significantly enlarged and remodeled the house in the Neoclassical Revival Style. He raised the roof, replaced the square-columned porch with Tuscan columns and extensive ornamentation, added the brick sleeping porch on the left and the formal porch on the right, incorporated Hill’s free-standing law office into the main house as a bedroom, and attached the kitchen. The stained glass windows on the stair landing, the interior transoms, and the Craftsman-style built-in cabinets in the right hand parlor also date from the Baldwin remodeling. Also, a sleeping porch was added to make hot Georgia nights more bearable. The Guest House in the back was built before 1900. Originally it was a small barn, and then converted into a garage. At some later time, it was converted again and occupied as a servant's cottage. During the1950s, locals clearly recall an elderly African American lady living there who would entertain children by singing songs in the late evening. There seem to be no pictures of the house before the 1917 remodeling which transformed the home into a Neoclassical Revival Style.


Steve and Linda Huggins purchased the Joshua Hill house in 2007 and embarked on an ambitious project which lasted until late 2010. During that time there were never fewer than four full-time workers engaged. The architect for the project was Joseph Smith of Madison, Georgia. The remodeling and expansion project was managed by Whitsel Construction Services of Danielsville. The firm, owned by Curtis Whitsel, specializes in restoration of period homes, and has been involved in many of the major projects throughout Georgia. Whitsel’s team extensively refurbished and updated the existing home, as well as expanding the main house and adding several additional outbuildings and structures. Several teams of landscapers brought the two-acre lot to its present state of development. Russell Faulkner supervised the team of craftsmen who made all the following changes.


Working carefully to retain the Neoclassical Style, the Huggins massive restoration included strengthening and leveling the foundation, replacing the hand-dug partial basement with concrete and cinder block, removing, rebuilding and reinstalling the front columns, installing wall and roof insulation, replacing the ground floor with re-claimed heart-of-pine wood from a demolished century-old Atlanta factory, upgrading to a metal roofing and rebuilding the built-in metal gutters, installing modern mechanical, electrical, HVAC and plumbing systems, expanding the brick walkways, and undertaking numerous other repairs. They enclosed and expanded the rear of the house to create a new master suite and a keeping room plus a modern kitchen with pantries. The back porch is the original having been relocated to serve the new additions.

The Huggins also installed a pool, raised and replaced both the front and pool-side porches, enhanced the landscaping, rebuilt the servant’s quarters as a Guest House, and built a gazebo and a potting shed. The new landscaping includes several distinct planting areas, each with unique character, an herb garden, and a vegetable garden enclosed by a wooden picket fence. A large ornamental metal fence encloses much of the property. The irrigation system is fed by a well the Huggins had dug in the attached one-acre pecan grove. The guest house is rebuilt and expanded using the materials and footprint of a nineteenth-century structure originally used as a barn, a garage, and a servant’s quarters.

Comments & Feedback

All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and should be independently verified. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. OldHouses.com is not responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, misprints and shall be held totally harmless.

Listing No. 26810

Prev Next # 36 of 50

of the list
Priced at or above 200,000

Back to List

New Search

Like This Listing?

Agent Contact Information

Evelyn Van Oostrom

Phone: 770-616-4460

www.alginrealty.com

Tell 'em you saw it on OldHouses.com!

Your Feedback

Help & Support.

Return to Top
Pinterest
[X]